STATIONS

  • EIAR, Italy - Italy's main shortwave broadcaster, RAI, left shortwave in 2007. Its ancestor station, EIAR, was a strong presence in its day, including an "American Hour" in 1935. Here is their published schedule for that December of that year, together with a "season's greeting" postcard that they sent to listeners in 1938.
  • Radio Universidad de Costa Rica - Here are several items in a mini-tribute to Radio Universidad de Costa Rica. One looks to be a regular RUCR envelope (note the inclusion of the shortwave channel on the bottom front, but not the back), with two stamps commemorating the writing of the lyrics to the Costa Rican national anthem by Jose Maria Zeledon, and a cancellation commemorating the 55th anniversary of the station. The date of the cancellation appears to be written as "14:22 Julio, 2004," which we believe was the celebratory period, July 14-22. The station came on the air on November 29, 1949. There are some online references to the station's history here and also to the 2004 celebration here. You will have to rely on your Spanish for the full story, which is contained in "Historia de Radio--Radioemisoras de la Universidad de Costa Rica," published in 2014. Also posted is a recording of their shortwave channel, 6105 kHz, made on June 6, 1998, at 0604 UTC s/off; and a 1978 QSL belonging to the late John D. Tuchscherer.
  • OZF, Denmark - Here is an info sheet and QSL dating from 1938 from what was later known as Radio Denmark. The call letters, OZF, and the station's well-known frequency, 9520 kHz., became familiar to shortwave listeners everywhere, especially after 1948, when the station went from 6 kw. to 50 kw. OZF came into regular use in the mid-1930s. For some radio-related Danish philately, check out these First Day Covers.
  • RCA "Worldwide Wireless" Postcards - Following up on the information we posted (below) about RCA's international non-broadcast facilities, here is a collection of world map postcards promoting the "Worldwide Wireless" messaging capabilities of RCA Communications, Inc.
  • "Across the Atlantic and Pacific -- Via RCA" - RCA was the leading force in non-broadcast shortwave transmission during the medium's development before World War II. Here is a promotional booklet published by RCA circa 1933. It describes for a general audience the company's contributions in various aspects of commercial shortwave transmission. It starts off with a vignette containing details of how the RCA "Radiogram" system works, and how it permitted near-instant communication around the world. That is followed (p. 10) by a description of the history of radio, then (p. 18) a description of maritime shortwave. Pages 20-34 contain brief descriptions of RCA messaging services in 45 places around the world, and this is followed by information about the RCA "Photogram" (FAX) service. The text concludes with a description of the RCA "Overseas Radio Program" service that relayed broadcast transmissions for rebroadcast in distant places.
  • CFRB/CFRX - Here is the Tenth Anniversary Yearbook (1937) of CFRB, Toronto. The station's then-new shortwave outlet was CFRX, 6070 kHz., which took to the air on February 11, 1937. The yearbook has much info about the station, and radio in general, but not much specifically about CFRX, save for the description of the new shortwave project on pg. 8. And on pg. 61 there is a list of shortwave broadcasters. It's not mentioned in the yearbook, but Fridays at midnight both CFRB and CFRX carried five minutes of DX tips from the NNRC. CFRX and CFVP are the last private shortwave broadcasters still operating in Canada.
  • CHNS/CHNX - The well-known Nova Scotia shortwaver CHNX, came to air on shortwave in 1930, four years after it started transmitting on the broadcast band as CHNS. The shortwave call letters were VE9CE, changed to VE9HX in 1933 and CHNX in 1938. Here is the CHNS 1934 Yearbook, containing much information about the station, as well as references to other Canadian broadcasters. While its focus is on the broadcast band, there are a couple of mentions of VE9HX (pgs. 2 and 48), plus other items particularly relevant to shortwave: p. 28 (hams and reporting codes), pgs. 30-31 (BBC rebroadcasts), p. 33 (radio bands), pgs. 34-35 (principal shortwave stations of the world), and p. 36 (pointers for new SWLs).
  • CJRX - CJRX, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada appears to have been the earliest Canadian commercial broadcast station transmitting regularly on shortwave. It came to air in 1928. The call letters changed to CKRX in 1943, and the station remained on the air (on 11720 kHz.) until around 1956. Here is a copy of the station's radio bulletin for December 1929. It contains many interesting photos and much information about the station and its mediumwave partners.
  • Radio Free Russia - We have already posted several items about the clandestine station, Radio Free Russia (NTS): a recording of the station's ID, the station's QSL, and a "cinderella" (non-postage) stamp issued by the station in 1964 (scroll down). Now we have another item, a two-sided sheet containing what purports to be photos of Radio Free Russia "in the field." Some of the captions are humorous, but it seems to be a genuine item, apparently intended, at least in part, for fund raising, as there is a bank account number for donations. We have also posted a file containing an article about Radio Free Russia from the October 1966 issue of FRENDX, as the NASWA journal was called back then. It is written by an ace DXer of that period, Gregg Calkin. Radio Free Russia, which closed down around 1976, is also covered in Bill Matthew's article, "Clandestines--The Political Voice of Radio" (p. 137), in the 1971 edition of "How to listen to the World." For more on Radio Free Russia, see the website "Latvian History."
  • RCA Broadcast News Articles - Here are two more articles from the 1940s about familiar stations. Bob LaRose found these in RCA Broadcast News on the American Radio History website. They are: (1) "WWV . . . WWV . . . WWV - Broadcasting Frequency Standards With RCA Type ET-7285 Transmitters," by R. J. Newman, Transmitter Engineering Section, January 1945 (No. 40), pgs. 48-54; and (2) "Canada's Loudest Voice," January 1946 (No. 42), pgs. 66-70.
  • RCA Shortwave Transmitters - Bob LaRose has been looking through some of the old issues of RCA Broadcast News that are posted at the American Radio History website and draws our attention to three RCA Broadcast News articles about RCA shortwave transmitters used in the service of the VOA and allied governments during World War II. The articles are: (1) "The 50-SW, A New Transmitter for International Broadcasting," January 1944 (No. 38), pgs. 24-28; (2) "O Brasil Fala . . . Brazil Speaks," by W. J. Reilley, Intl. Dept., January 1944 (No. 38), pgs. 29-31; and (3) "WOOC . . . WOOW - International Broadcast Stations Installed by CBS at Wayne, N.J.," by R. N. DeHart, General Engineering Dept., CBS, June 1945 (No. 41), pgs. 18-24.
  • Radio Free Europe - Here are some interesting items about Radio Free Europe: several philatelic items from Poland that feature RFE (these are from the post-Soviet years); and a couple of pins from the mid-1950s "Crusade for Freedom" era (the supposed-private organization behind RFE, which was actually funded by the CIA). Newspaperboys were enlisted to solicit donations from customers, and the "newspaperboys" pins must have been part of that effort.
  • BBC - Here are two BBC items from very different eras. One is a picture of the antenna of 5SW, the BBC experimental shortwave station, in 1929. It had come on the air in November 1927 and was located at the Marconi plant. The other is a BBC quarterly folder for the period October-November 1962 containing an hour-by-hour schedule of the General Overseas Service and various other items. Thanks to Bob LaRose for sending this along.
  • Radio Canada Shortwave Club Antenna Handbook - We have posted quite a few items from Radio Canada, and here is another.
  • Radio Nederland - As Eddie Startz used to say, "Keep in Touch With the Dutch!" Here are several Radio Nederland items from 1956: the year's calendar, the summer schedule, and the Radio Nederland antenna booklet.
  • WWVH, Hawaii - We go to the Pacific. Here is a brochure about WWVH. It was published in 1974 or some time thereafter, and provides a brief description of the station's operation until that time. It began transmitting, from Maui, in 1949, and moved to a different island, Kauai, which is its present location, in 1971. We have also posted a file containing several WWVH QSL cards.
  • More VOA - Here are two more Voice of America items: a schedule from 1965, courtesy of Bob LaRose, and an aerial view of the VOA relay station, Monrovia, Liberia (the original is 11x14"; zoom in for detail). Judging by the label on the photo (and by the cars), this is probably from the early 1960s, when Page Communications Engineers designed and built the station. It opened at 50 kw. in 1962 and went to 250 kw. in 1964.
  • Turkish Shortwave Stations - Although several smaller Turkish shortwave stations have been heard regularly in recent years, it's easy to forget that there was a time when Turkey was host to a plethora of small, largely local stations that operated on shortwave. Some made it into the World Radio TV Handbook, but many didn't. Most were connected to educational institutions, and usually their operation was on out-of-band channels in the 6 and 7 MHz. region. Owing to their low power, most were considered "impossible" DX catches in the United States, and many were unheard even in Europe. To shed some light on this corner of the DX world, the British Association of DXers in 1972 published a list of these stations. We have posted the list here.
  • RIAS, Berlin - Well-known RIAS, Radio in the American Sector, operated from Berlin from 1946 until it merged with several other stations c. 1994. Usually heard on 6005 kHz. shortwave in America, it could sometimes be heard on mediumwave as well. Here is a booklet about the station, published c. 1964, and a QSL from that year obtained by mediumwave DXer Kermit Geary.
  • ORU, Brussels, Belgium - Here is a pamphlet from ORU, Brussels, Belgium. It shares some content with the OTC publication posted earlier, but there is some original material as well, plus some additional photos. This piece originally belonged to DXer Kermit Geary. Go to the "DX Jewelry" page to see the pin which was offered to members of the station's "Amongst Friends" club.
  • VOA Morocco Relay Station - Here is an interesting VOA certificate of appreciation, thanking one Jon Erikson for his contribution "to the planning, design, implementation, and construction" of the Morocco Relay Station, that is, the Briech station, which opened in 1993. Amplifying the colors a bit reveals the signer to be Robert E. Kamosa, after whom the Robert E. Kamosa Transmitting Station in the Northern Marianas is named. Who was Jon Erikson?
  • The BBC Empire Service - In "our day" we knew it as the General Overseas Service, or the World Service, but when the BBC regularized its international shortwave broadcasting efforts in 1932, five years after the start of G5SW, it was known as the Empire Service. All programing was in English; foreign-language programs would not follow until 1938 (Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese). Here is a booklet titled "The Empire Service," published by the BBC in 1935. It contains historical, program and technical information about the service at that time. We have also posted an Empire Service time and frequency schedule from December 1935.
  • South African Rooftop Transmitter - Colin Miller, VE3CMT, has sent along an interesting story from the pages of the SABC Radio Bulletin of April 3, 1961. It tells the story of an early South African shortwave transmitter atop Broadcast House in Johannesburg. It was set up during World War II to serve as an emergency backup for the wired studio-transmitter link. It was operational from 1940 to 1955, and it operated on 68 metres, which is probably the transmitter shown in the WRTH for 1947 and a couple of subsequent years on 4373 kHz., 68.60 meters, 200 watts. (The article says 400 watts; and FBIS for August 1, 1945 shows a South African transmitter inactive on 4381 kHz.)
  • Radio Liberty/Radio Liberation - Thanks to Bob LaRose for this very nice promotional brochure for Radio Liberty, the American-run station based in Germany and beaming to the Soviet Union. Accompanying it is a file of Radio Liberty/Radio Liberation QSLs, located in The CPRV Gallery (look under Germany). The station was called Radio Liberation when it was founded in 1953, but the name was changed to Radio Liberty in 1959. It was combined administratively with Radio Free Europe in 1975. Radio Liberty was one of the stations that Mikhail Gorbachev said he listened to when he was being held captive during the Soviet coup attempt of 1991.
  • 4VGM, Magloire Broadcasting Circuit, Port-au-Prince, Haiti - Although during the 1930s and later many stations aired shortwave "specials" at the request of DX clubs and radio magazines, they were never as numerous as on mediumwave, where, for the benefit of DXers who might not be able to hear the station during normal hours, or for promotional purposes, a station might broadcast a special program for DXers. Most were from domestic U.S. stations, but there were many foreign specials too. Here is a file containing the tracks of one such special, from station 4VGM, Magloire Broadcasting Circuit, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, which operated with 1 kw. on 1430 kHz. (The station's 6165 kHz. shortwave channel also carried the special.) The program was broadcast in February 1951. In the file are the announcements that appeared in the National Radio Club and the Newark News Radio Club bulletins. The NRC announced it for February 18, while the NNRC said it was scheduled for February 11, with February 18 as the backup date, and it was on the 18th that it was actually heard. Included are 12 pages from the NRC bulletin where the special was reported, and one page from the NNRC Bulletin. In addition, a Haitian newspaper contained a big spread on the test, with extracts from reports sent in by a who's who of the mediumwave greats of the day--Magnuson, Prater, Cooper, Geary, Botzum, Hank Holbrook. Completing the file is DXer Sidney Steele's QSL for the test, and a 4VGM envelope that was sent to Kermit Geary. Set your PDF reader at 100% to read all the details.
  • WRUL-Radio New York Worldwide-WNYW - This time we focus on WRUL, as the station was known from 1939 to 1962, when it started announcing as Radio New York Worldwide [RNYW] (it became WNYW on June 1, 1966). Here are a number of items relating to this historic station, all from our good friend Bob LaRose of San Diego, California. There are two groups: Group I, items about the station's history: (1) WRUL Fact Sheet (probably c. 1960); (2) "RNYW DXing Worldwide," DX publication of the RNYW DX program, "DXing Worldwide" (November 1964); (3) a news release about "DXing Worldwide" (probably c. 1964); (4) "Selling via Short Wave," an historical look at the station from the July 6, 1965 issue of Radio-TV Daily; and (5) a news release about the projected new transmitter plant near Chatsworth, New Jersey (March 4, 1966; the plans were cancelled the next year). Group II, items about the station's programs: (6) WRUL Program Schedule, February 1960; (7) English-language schedule, Spring 1965; (8) Spanish-language program schedule, "Guia de Programas," January-July 1966; (9) English-language schedule, January-June 1966; and (10) a promotional release for the program, "Scouting Worldwide" (probably 1966).
  • "The Sounds of Hawaii on Shortwave" - Hearing Hawaii on shortwave always seemed special, but it was seldom that you could hear actual Hawaiian programming over the islands' shortwave stations. There were, however, some locally-grown Hawaiian programs that were carried over a couple of Hawaii's shortwave transmitters. The story is told in this article.
  • More "Zeesen" - We return to Germany, with two more items from "Zeesen," the German shortwave station that dominated the short waves during World War II and before. They are: (1) an October 1939 German-English letter to listeners, outlining changes in their broadcasting (the war in Europe had started the month before); and (2) "Hello, Everybody! A Voice of Friendship, Short Waves Over the World," a four-page English-language writeup about shortwave and the German station's "Waves of Friendship."
  • S.S. Leviathan - Save for the war years, the S.S. Leviathan plied the waters of the North Atlantic from 1914 to 1934. Otherwise lost to history, but of interest to radio types, is an event aboard ship that took place on November 30, 1930, when the Leviathan was traveling from Boston to New York. According to press reports, the Leviathan made the first broadcast from a ship at sea, the program originating from the ship's on-board nightclub, the Club Leviathan. According to a carboned letter dated December 23, 1930 to DXer Dave Thomas, presumably in response to a reception report, the transmission was made from the ship on 4177.5 kHz. to the AT&T station in Forked River, New Jersey, and sent from there by wire to New York and on to broadcast stations of the NBC network. With the letter was a 1930 booklet from AT&T, "Voiceways Overseas from Lawrenceville," Lawrenceville, New Jersey being one of AT&T's main ship to shore transmission facilities of the day. For more on AT&T's multiple New Jersey locations, see Adrian Peterson's Wavescan N62, May 2, 2010.
  • "Zeesen" - Here is a brochure from "Zeesen," the powerful German shortwave station that put in strong signals worldwide during the 1930s and the war years. This was apparently intended for German citizens abroad, for the title, in English, is "German, Your Homeland Speaks to You--A Visit to the German Shortwave Station in Berlin." It contains many interesting "inside" photos, with legends in German, English and Spanish (zoom in to read). I believe it dates from around 1939. You might not have agreed with the message, but the station had some of the most professionally-produced programming and strongest listener relations of any shortwave station. BTW: The seal on the form that the group is looking at on p. 5--it is from the Short Wave League, a magazine-based "club" sponsored by Short Wave Craft (Short Wave & Television after 1936); and that wall poster on p. 6 is the same design as one of Zeesen's QSLs.
  • Voice of America 40th Anniversary - Here is a booklet published by the Voice of America for its 40th anniversary celebration on February 24,1982, including a list of honors awarded at the time. There has always been doubt as to the VOA's correct "birthday." February 24 was the date used for many years, but more recent research http://www.unc.edu/depts/diplomat/item/2011/0104/fsl/fsl_robertsvoa.html concluded that the correct date is February 1, the "birthdate" that the VOA has now adopted http://www.insidevoa.com/section/voa_history/2330.html.
  • HCJB, Quito, Ecuador - If you miss hearing HCJB regularly on SW, take a walk down memory lane with our HCJB Tribute Page. We have pulled together much HCJB memorabilia, including literature produced by the station (some of it dating back to the 1940s and 1950s); various articles about HCJB; audio and video pieces about the station; HCJB QSL-cards, pennants, stickers and philately; the covers of several books and LP records about HCJB; and a bunch of HCJB souvenirs. In addition, we have posted PDF copies of all 179 issues of ANDEX International, the ANDEX club newsletter, along with an extensive index.  We would like to make this page as complete as possible, so if you have any other material that you would like to see posted here, please let us know.
  • "A Brief History" of the Voice of America - published by VOA. It looks like it was issued around 1997.
  • "The Rugby Radio Station of the British Post Office" - The anchor station of the "Imperial Wireless Chain"--the Marconi "beam system" that linked the far corners of the British Empire--was in Rugby, England. It came into service on longwave in 1926, at first offering only telegraph service, expanding to voice in 1927. Shortwave came into use in 1928. Here is a pamphlet, "The Rugby Radio Station of the British Post Office," published in 1938. Rugby was the rough parallel of RCA's Radio Central at Rocky Point, Long Island. For the "Official History" of Rugby, see http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/r/rugby_radio/indexr67.shtml and for an interesting film about Rugby, made in 1932, see http://www.britishpathe.com/video/the-worlds-greatest-radio-station-aka-rugby-wirele/query/radios.
  • RCA-NBC "Short Wave News" - In the pre-VOA days, American shortwave broadcasting was entirely in the hands of an array of private shortwave stations, many operated by the big radio companies of the day, e.g. Crosley, Westinghouse, G.E., etc.  WRCA and WNBI were owned by RCA and NBC, New York. The call letters of the transmitters, which were located in Bound Brook, New Jersey, were eventually consolidated into WBOU. Here is a copy of the RCA-NBC weekly promotional shortwave sheet, "Short Wave News," containing the multi-lingual schedule of WRCA-WNBI programming for December 24-30, 1939. The original sheet measures 11-3/4 x 22-1/2". To see QSLs from WRCA and WNBI, check out "American States on Shortwave" (New Jersey) under "Specialized Resources."
  • The Cathode Press - Machlett Laboratories of Springdale, Connecticut was a manufacturer of high-power transmitting tubes utilized by the Voice of America and many other stations. The Matchlett house publication, The Cathode Press, published a number of articles about the growth and development of the VOA. Here are three: (1) "This is the Voice of America" by Foy D. Kohler (Vol. 9, No. 3, 1952); (2) "The Voice of America--the Development of a Program of Transmitting Facilities and Methods for Reaching Target  Areas Around the World" by George Q. Herrick & Raymond Kaplan (Vol. 9, No. 4, 1952); and (3) "The Voice of America--A Generation of Growth" by Edward F. Burgeni, George Jacobs & Edward T. Martin (Vol. 22, No. 1, 1965). The articles cover such topics as VOA history, relay stations, mobile operations, jamming, audience and programming, etc.
  • Radio Deutsche Welle, Rwanda - The Deutsche Welle relay station in Kigali was scheduled to be closed on March 28, 2015. In connection with that event, Bob LaRose of California has sent us a page from a 1964 edition of DW's "Hallo, Friends" where the "new" Kigali station is described.
  • "Wireless Communications" - In shortwave's early days, commercial messaging, rather than broadcasting, was the new medium's principal function. In Australia, this service was offered by Amalgamated Wireless (Australasia) Ltd. (AWA) through its directional "beam system." Here is a 44-page booklet, "Wireless Communications," published by AWA in 1932. It contains all you will ever want to know about how the beam system was set up and how the messaging system worked. AWA facilities were also used for broadcast purposes, as noted in the timeline on pgs. 36 and 38. The Pennant Hills (Sydney) shortwave broadcast transmitter is shown on p. 30.
  • More Voice of America Program Schedules - Recently we posted some VOA schedule booklets from 1966-67. Here are two more from earlier years. One, in German and English, is for July-August 1949. The other, in English, is for January-February 1951. (The schedule tables in the booklets are in the language of the broadcasts.)
  • Swiss Broadcasting Corporation - Few stations could put in a better signal to Eastern North America than the Swiss Broadcasting Corp. Here is their schedule for Summer 1947.
  • Radio Cultura, Sao Paulo, Brazil - You don't often see English-language promotional material from stations in Latin America. Here is an illustrated folder from Radio Cultura, Sao Paulo, Brazil. It describes the station's many capabilities, and even includes U.S. contact addresses for potential advertisers. It appears that this piece is from around 1947. What is interesting is that at that time Radio Cultura was on mediumwave only. It did not come on shortwave until 1953.
  • Voice of America Program Schedules - It has been a long time since international broadcasters sent out paper program schedules, probably even longer since you've seen one from the Voice of America. Here are two that were sent out by VOA in 1966-67, one for the Far East service and one for the Middle East service. There were also schedules for South Asia, Latin America, Europe and Africa. They all shared some common pages, with some area-specific features added.
  • Radio Moscow - Radio Moscow, whose signal once blanketed the shortwave bands, is now but a memory. Here is a promotional booklet issued by the station, apparently circa 1956 (judging from the postmarks shown on the inside back cover).
  • WOR, Newark, New Jersey - Not shortwave, but one of the well-known early broadcast band stations was WOR, Newark, New Jersey, which was owned and operated by the even better-known Bamberger's department store. Here is an interesting little booklet from 1923 which will tell you about both the station and the store.
  • "Broadcast in Iceland" - The Iceland State Broadcast Service was founded in 1930, and several years later its programs started appearing on shortwave, 9060 and 12240 kHz. Here is a pamphlet about the ISBS, "Broadcast in Iceland," which was published circa 1938-39.
  • FEBC Philippines - Here is a file containing three items from FEBC: a postcard, probably circa 1956, showing DZAS station personalities; a copy of the FEBC Overseas Program Schedule for June-August 1962 (note "Hints for Good Listening" on the last page); and a copy of the FEBC newsletter The Signal, issue of November-December 1963.
  • USCGC Courier - The USCGC Courier is best remembered for its decades-long broadcasts from offshore Rhodes, an island in the Dodecanese group, far from the Greek mainland. Previously we have posted a number of items pertaining to the Courier, and we have now consolidated them on one page. The VOA radio ship actually began its broadcasting life during a shakedown cruise to Panama, transmitting from the Canal Zone from April 18 to April 27, 1952 and identifying as KU2XAJ. We have posted two new Courier items from that trip. We are indebted to Henrik Klemetz for supplying us with a recording of one of the Spanish-language announcements that the ship used during the trip. The recording was made by Arne Skoog, editor of Sweden Calling DXers, who played it over the air at the time. We are also happy to have a brochure, "El Courier en Panamá," which was issued in commemoration of the ship's visit. It belonged to David F. Thomas, a well-known DXer of the day who lived in Proctorville, Ohio. The brochure, which is mostly in Spanish, appears to have been a local production, and contains many photos. It looks like there was quite a welcome for the ship, and an equally extensive publicity campaign on its behalf. We have also posted several other new items from the Courier, including an attractive ship's patch. The new items are marked "New."
  • XMHD, Shanghai, China - We have already posted a couple of items about XMHD, the mediumwave religious station that operated from Shanghai, China in the 1930s: a promotional record, and a brief article. Now there is more information about the station, and it is the basis of this new 10-page illustrated writeup.
  • Short Wave News Station Profiles - Recently we covered the early history of the International Short Wave League and its parent publication, Short Wave News. In 1947 the latter's publisher, Amagamated Short Wave Press, published a pamphlet, "These You Can Hear," containing a series of station profiles that had appeared in Short Wave News. In later years the magazine published other station descriptions as well, and we have gathered together some and posted them here. They are from the years 1947 to 1953, and the stations covered are: Polskie Radio; Radiojanst and Swedish Radio, Sweden (two articles); El Espectador, Uruguay; OIX7, Finnish Broadcasting Co., Finland; South African Broadcasting Corp., Klipheuvel; Technical University, Trondheim, Norway; Radio New Zealand; Radio Monte Carlo, Monaco; Swiss Shortwave Service (three articles); OTC, Belgian Congo (two articles); Voice of Spain; Radio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Radio Canada; Voice of Denmark; and Radiodiffusion Francaise, Paris (English Service). Short Wave News became The Radio Amateur in 1952.
  • Comoros - One of the most exotic SWBC DX targets was the Comoros. Located northwest of Madagascar, the French island territory came on shortwave in 1960 by way of a Radiodiffusion Television Francaise station transmitting from Dzaoudzi on the island of Mayotte. The station operated on 3331 and 7260 kHz. with 4 kw. In 1967 it was relocated to Moroni, Grand Comore. In 1975 the independent Republic of Comoros, with capital at Moroni, split away and became independent, while Mayotte remained French. The Moroni station became Radio Comores. It was on the air until the late 1980s, returning briefly in 1991 before disappearing for good on shortwave. The Comoros were sometimes heard in North America circa 0300 UTC. We have posted two files about the Comoros. In one you will find three QSLs from the Comoros station: one from 1963, when it was located at Dzaoudzi, and two from the Moroni period (1968 and 1979). The opening of the station in Dzaoudzi in 1960 was commemorated by the issuance of two good-looking postage stamps, and in a second file we have posted these stamps, together with two first-day covers celebrating the event. As you can see, one of the stamps shows the station's shortwave frequencies. Also in this file is another cover, from 1972, celebrating the establishment of radiotelegraph service between Moroni and Paris.
  • KDKA Letters - Among many other accomplishments, Clay T. Whitehead served as Director of the Office of Telecommunications Policy during 1970-74 (the Nixon administration). His papers are in the Library of Congress, and also online at http://claytwhitehead.com/ When he died in 2008 he was working on a book, The History of 20th Century Telecommunications: The Development and Regulation of Telecommunications and Broadcasting. The book was never completed, but his papers contain much of the research material that he had amassed in the course of his writing, including copies of many articles on early radio, letters from the fathers of radio, research memos on various topics, etc.--a huge body of material. Here are a series of letters from listeners in places worldwide--Brazil, Ireland, South Africa, Chile, Australia, others--to KDKA, reporting on reception of the station's shortwave signal. KDKA began regular shortwave transmissions around 4760 kc. in 1923. The letters are from 1924-25, making them among the earliest shortwave broadcast reception reports "ever."
  • "Presenting a New Ambassador to Latin America to Meet a New National Need" - In 1939, the Federal Communications Commission reversed its long-standing rule against advertising on shortwave. Although advertising would never provide the revenue that the various private shortwave broadcasters hoped for, at the time the stations viewed the new advertising opportunity optimistically. Latin America offered the greatest potential, and in 1940, as part of an effort to woo sponsors, NBC distributed a good-looking, oversize (11 x 17") promotional booklet headlined "Presenting a New Ambassador to Latin America to Meet a New National Need." It contained a letter from the Secretary of State, and it promoted shortwave as a boon to American business.
  • Radio Australia - Here are three items produced by Radio Australia: two histories of the station, one from 1969 (the station's 30th Anniversary), the other from 1989 (the 50th); and a 1969-70 writeup about Radio Australia's then-new Darwin shortwave facility.
  • British Forces Broadcasting Service - One of the most interesting stations of past decades was the British Forces Broadcasting Service, which over the years operated shortwave transmitters from many interesting places in Africa and Asia. The last of these to close was Singapore, in 1971. Some lucky DXers heard BFBS transmissions in connection with the Falklands War in 1982, a service that would share the local Falkland Islands Broadcasting Service shortwave channel for some years. Listeners were pleasantly surprised when much stronger BFBS signals appeared in 1990 in support of Britain's Operation Granby in the Gulf War, and again in 2003 during the Iraqi invasion. Here is a 1969 article about BFBS by Don Jensen. It is from Radio-TV Experimenter, and titled "Tommy's Dying Voice." With it we have posted a half-hour recording of BFBS shortwave made in August 1990 during the Gulf War.
  • "Las Emisoras de los Estados Unidos" - Both before and after Pearl Harbor, Latin America was a major target of American shortwave broadcasting. Although American shortwave did not come under government control until November 1942, one of the missions of the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs (CIAA), which was headed by Nelson Rockefeller, was to facilitate private American shortwave broadcasting to Latin America. One strategy was to insert in Latin American publications advertisements that promoted American shortwave. Here is a file containing 14 such Spanish-language advertisements that appeared in the Latin American version of Reader's Digest in 1943 and 1944. Where the ads contained addresses they were either the Department of Commerce in Washington, DC, or 444 Madison Avenue, New York, which was the CIAA's New York office. Even though the name "Voice of America" was by then in regular use, these ads made no mention of it, referring to the stations generically as "Las Emisoras de los Estados Unidos."
  • "Kleines Deutsches Rundfunk--ABC" - As shortwave stations developed foreign audiences, some offered language courses providing some basic knowledge of the language of the country where the station was located. Among these stations was "Zeesen," the Deutschen Kurzwellensender (German Shortwave Station). In connection with its German-language course the station offered a booklet, "Kleines Deutsches Rundfunk--ABC." Here is a version published in 1938. Subtitled "A Guide to the German Language for English-speaking Listeners of the German Short Wave Station," its 24 nicely-illustrated lessons are built around radio-related topics: announcements, greetings to listeners, music, talks, drama, news, etc. The course ends with a contest. The booklet's Introduction contains some background on the course.
  • Sharq al Adna - Michael Griffiths of Cardigan, Wales, has sent us a number of interesting photos of Sharq al Adna, the British-operated Near East Arab Broadcasting Station that was relocated to Cyprus in 1948 and eventually became the BBC East Mediterranean Relay Station. But Sharq started out in Jaffa, Palestine. Mick's father, James, was a wireless mechanic in the RAF, assigned to Special Operations and involved in maintaining radio equipment for British spies parachuted into Europe. In 1945 he was posted to Jaffa to be the technical lead at Sharq. He also did remote recording at various places across the Middle East. James declined to go to Cyprus when the station moved there, returning to civilian life instead. Although he did not pursue a career in broadcasting, his stories were instrumental in convincing Mick to take up a career in electronics. You will find the photos here. We have also added to the file a Sharq al Adna QSL-card and letter originally belonging to Roger Legge. Mick has also sent two extracts from an interesting diary (now in the Imperial War Museum archive) written by Major C. E. Law, who spent time at Sharq al Adna and also in Jerusalem, and we have also posted these abstracts as a file here. In the first extract (four pages), Major Law relates how and why the station was set up, and he makes some other interesting observations from those times. The second extract (five pages) appears to relate to the British Mediterranean Station, a sister operation of Sharq al Adna that used the Sharq facilities to broadcast beyond the Arab world. If you want to know the full story of Sharq al Adna, ask your library to get you this article by Douglas A. Boyd: "Sharq al-Adna/The Voice of Britain," Gazette: The International Journal for Communication Studies, Vol. 65, No. 6 (2003), p. 443-455. Many thanks to Mick Griffiths for sharing this interesting information with us.
  • Bob LaRose on Liberia - Here are some comments that Bob LaRose of California sent in about the shortwave radio scene in Liberia, together with some photos from Bob and an ELWA postcard.
  • Liberian Rural Communications Network (LRCN) - Everyone knows ELWA, but do you remember the Liberian Rural Communications Network (LRCN), which operated in 1987? The USAID-sponsored station broadcast from transmitters in Voinjama, Gbarnga and Zwedru. These were all mediumwave. In addition, however, the station transmitted programming to the three stations by way of a 10 kw. SSB feeder transmitter in Monrovia, which operated in the 49 and 75 meter bands and could be heard in the U.S. on 3975 kHz. during a narrow window starting at 0700 UTC. Here is Don Jensen's QSL from LRCN, together with two LRCN brochures (Brochure 1, Brochure 2), and an LRCN button.
  • Radio Japan and Radio Netherlands Relays - For several decades, relay arrangements have been an important part of international shortwave broadcasting. Here are several items pertaining to the start of relays of Radio Japan and Radio Netherlands. From Japan, we have posted two issues of Radio Japan News, the station's newsletter for listeners. The six-page 1986 issue celebrates the start of Radio Japan relays over RCI, Canada. (We have reproduced the English pages only.) The all-English, four-page 1991 issue relates the story of the start of Radio Japan relays from Sri Lanka, and also contains a timeline of Radio Japan's post-war development. We have also posted a promotional item, "Radio Netherlands International Bonaire Relay Station," which appears to have been written circa 1992.
  • Radio Portugal DX Club - Lots of the big stations had "clubs" of various kinds, geared mainly to solicit mail from listeners. Although the Radio Portugal DX Club, which was formed in 1964, also solicited reception reports, it provided some other useful benefits as well, including the forwarding of reports to other stations throughout the Portuguese-speaking world and the issuance of certificates rewarding the QSLing of stations in the Portuguese world. Certificates were available at the 10-station (Bronze), 20 (Silver), and 50 (Gold) station levels. The club also had two pages in Radio Portugal's quarterly listener magazine. Here is a 1966 brochure explaining how the club operated and detailing the certificate program. (Due to the difficulty of hearing many of the African stations, American listeners were allowed to submit QSLs from Brazil in order to satisfy half the African station requirement.) The cover of the brochure shows one of the certificates. Does anyone have one? We would be happy to post it on ontheshortwaves.
  • ELWA - Here are some items from SWL old-time favorite ELWA, Monrovia, Liberia: the "ELWA Photo Album," a folder with views of the station; a 1963 issue of the "ELWA Radio News Bulletin," the station's newsletter; and an ELWA schedule for the period December 1955-February 1956 (when the frequencies were 4835 and 11800 kc.).
  • XMHD, China - Jim Bowman, whose father was Dr. Robert H. Bowman, co-founder of the Far East Broadcasting Corp. in the Philippines, has sent us an undated article, "XMHD-China," from International Christian Broadcasters Bulletin. It contains some information about XMHD, a Chinese station of the 1930s from which we have earlier posted a 78 rpm promotional recording (see below under "Recordings" or click here). Thanks to Jim for bringing us this information.
  • Trans World Radio - Trans World Radio is well known to SWLs. Starting out in 1954 as the Voice of Tangier, it was reborn as Trans World Radio, Monaco in 1960, and over the years expanded to sites in Bonaire, Swaziland, Guam and elsewhere. Here are a number of items pertaining to TWR: QSLs, reading matter, recordings, etc.
  • "Reaching Russia" - We all know Trans World Radio. But did you know that it began in 1954 as the Voice of Tangier, operating at first with 2.5 kw., then 10 kw.? Here is a 1959 booklet, "Reaching Russia," about one of the station's goals: putting its signal into the Soviet Union. More religion and Russia than radio, the booklet contains some pictures and other info about the station.
  • Radio of Free Asia - In several articles which are posted under "Specialized Resources," "Wavescan" (Nov 20, 2011; Nov 4, 2012; Nov 18, 2012), Adrian Peterson details the several "Radio Free Asia" stations that have existed over the years. The "second" RFA, actually called Radio of Free Asia, is covered in the November 4, 2012 ed. of "Wavescan." ROFA was a project of the Korean Cultural and Freedom Foundation, and was active from 1966 to 1978 over various Far East transmitters. Here is an ROFA newsletter that appears to date from early 1973. (Note the references to the apparently still-imprisoned John McCain.)
  • WLWO - Here is a promotional brochure from the late Crosley-owned American shortwave station WLWO. WLWO started out as 8XAL, Harrison, Ohio, in 1924, simulcasting WLW. Originally 100 watts, it soon increased power to 250 watts, and it moved to Mason, Ohio in 1929 (having become W8XAL in 1928). It increased power to 10 kw. in 1932, to 50 kw. in 1940 (by which time it had become WLWO), and soon thereafter to 75 kw. Like all the privately owned American shortwave broadcasters of the time, it had its own Latin American service, which expanded greatly when the station went into U.S. government service in March 1942, well before the government took over all U.S. shortwave broadcasting in November of that year. This brochure appears to date from around mid-1940.
  • KDKA - Here is a pamphlet on the technical side of the KDKA facilities in 1932. At that time KDKA was on both the broadcast band and shortwave (W8XK). The pamphlet was prepared by two Westinghouse radio engineers for the Institute of Radio Engineers convention in Pittsburgh.
  • Westinghouse "Radio Broadcasting News" - It has suffered some water damage during its 90 year life, but that makes this item we all the more interesting. "Radio Broadcasting News," was a program guide put out by Westinghouse, seemingly on a weekly basis, in radio's early years. This four-page issue is from May 7, 1922, and covers KDKA, plus three Westinghouse stations that followed soon after: WJZ, Newark , NJ (later NYC); KYW, Chicago; and (briefly) WBZ, Springfield, Mass. (WBZ and WBZA in Boston did not exchange calls until 1934.) Interestingly, the masthead says that May 7, 1922 was their "Seventy-second Week Broadcasting." An examination of calendars for those years indicates that it was 80 weeks from the start of KDKA transmissions on November 2, 1920 to the week of May 7, 1922. If May 7 was their 72nd week, the first week would have been the week of December 26, 1920. Perhaps the station did not consider November 2 as its "official" start? What was the status of KDKA for the months immediately after the historic November 2 broadcast? In any event, KDKA is generally acknowledged to have been the world's first shortwave broadcaster, and May 7, 1922 was before those shortwave transmissions began. Intermittent shortwave broadcasting from KDKA started circa August-October of 1922, "regular" shortwave broadcasting in July 1923. So this pamphlet dates from before commencement of shortwave operations by the world's first shortwave broadcaster.
  • Letters to PCJ - Some time ago we posted an illustrated pamphlet from the Netherlands called "PCJ, Short Waves and Long Distances." It describes the activities of historic Dutch station PCJ, and it dates from around 1929, which is very early in the history of shortwave broadcasting. In the middle of the pamphlet, pages 22-23, is a reproduction of six listener letters received by the station back then. The letters are not easily legible in the original or in the electronic copy. However, when scanned at high resolution they become easily readable, and we have now posted a PDF of these letters here. The letters, which are all in English save one, and at least five of the six from 1929 (the date on one is illegible), are from the following places, starting at the center-top and going clockwise: Cape May, NJ; Douglas, AZ; Geidam, Nigeria; Rangoon, Burma (handwritten); and Hartford, CT (year unclear). I believe the handwritten letter at center-bottom, only partially visible, is in French; it appears to be from Beni Abbes, which is in western Algeria. Set your Adobe Reader for 200% magnification for best reading of these fascinating messages from a world long ago. (From the Rangoon letter: "I have strict instructions from my wife to wake her up as soon as you come through and although it is bitterly cold at that time she gets out of her warm bed. As I only have one pair of phones at present I have to sit on the arm of her chair and every time there comes a particularly nice or loud piece she lifts up one phone slightly and I am allowed to bend down and listen.")
  • TI4NRH - TI4NRH was the historic Costa Rican shortwave station that came on the air in 1928 and was widely heard during the 1930s. Here is a file containing three envelope stuffers from TI4NRH. The first is a short message from the station's friendly owner and founder, Amando Cespedes Marin. The second is a 4-page pamphlet, "The Voice of Costa Rica." The third is another 4-page pamphlet, this one issued in connection with the May 1938 celebration of the station's tenth anniversary. During that month, TI4NRH broadcast a series of 31 special programs, each dedicated to a particular station, club, publication or person in the shortwave world. The pamphlet lists the honorees and their connection to TI4NRH.
  • "Radio-France" - In the next entry (below) we presented some postcard views of the high-power radio center at Saint-Assise, France. Among the business handled at "Radio-France," Saint-Assise, was telegram traffic. Here is a French-English promotional pamphlet that "Radio-France" made available to those wishing to send telegrams. It includes a list of corresponding stations in other countries, rate information, and three blanks for composing telegrams. (Some of the stations listed were also known to carry some broadcast programming, including Transradio Internacional in Argentina, Amalgamated Wireless in Australia, and Transradio Espanola in Spain.)
  • Radio France Centre de T.S.F. de Saint-Assise - In 1922, France inaugurated a point-to-point transmission center which was the country's answer to RCA's Radio Central at Rocky Point, Long Island, which had opened the previous year. It was at Saint-Assise, 25 miles southeast of Paris. Here are four files with postcard views of the installation. Principally a longwave station, it was at first divided into two parts. The continental station, designed to serve Europe, could put out up to 100 kw. power, while the transcontinental station could operate at 200-1500 kw. A shortwave transmitting capability was added later, and a receiving station was located at Villacresnes. The aerial structure included 16 towers, 44 miles of cable, 50 miles of copper ground wire, ands a mile-square's worth of copper plates. The postcards are in four files. (File 1) The first contains three outside views of the administrative facilities, a view of the transcontinental (left) and continental (right) stations and antenna farms, and a view of one of the tower bases: (File 2) the second contains four views of the transcontinental station; (File 3) the third contains six views of the continental station; and (File 4) the fourth contains three views of the shortwave station.
  • Reichs-Rundfunk Gesellschaft ("Zeesen") - In the days leading up to World War II, the German station, Reichs-Rundfunk Gesellschaft, commonly known as "Zeesen" (after the transmitter location), was one of the strongest on the bands. And it was no less a leader in the new field of international radio propaganda. Starting circa 1935, the station replied to listener letters with a small (4 inch) 78 rpm record. Here are scans of the record, together with MP3 files of the audio content, which is in German on one side, English on the other.
  • British Forces Broadcasting Service - During and after World War II, quite a few of the larger British Forces Broadcasting Service stations had their own program guides. Here is one from the British forces mediumwave station, Rome, for the week beginning December 24, 1944.
  • "Zeesen" Program Schedule - Here is a program schedule that you would have received in November 1940 from the "Zeesen" shortwave station in Germany if you lived in North America and were on the mailing list. As this one indicates, schedules to North American listeners were at the time sent out from the German Library of Information in New York City, which the U.S. government closed in 1941. Note the reference to the "Lord Haw-Haw" programs, as well as those of various American turncoats--Fred Kaltenbach, E. D. Ward, Otto Koischwitz ("O.K. Speaking").
  • WWNY 1948 Test - DX tests ("Courtesy Programs") have always been a staple of the BCB (AM) DXing hobby. One such test was conducted by WWNY-790 in Watertown, NY, on Nov. 1, 1948. Here is a file with an article from the Watertown Daily Times newspaper acknowledging some of the reception reports received, the 1948 WWNY QSL letter, and selected pages from both the NNRC and NRC club bulletins regarding the test. This is an example of how a DX event of the past can be brought to life through the use of multiple resources (in this case a newspaper clipping, bulletin collections, and the CPRV files).
  • WWJ - The battle over who was the "first" broadcasting station in the U.S. began long ago and still fosters strong opinions. Although most people give the prize to KDKA, WWJ has long made a strong case for the title. Here is a pamphlet issued by The Detroit News that describes both the newspaper and it's station, WWJ. It looks like the pamphlet dates from the late 1930s or early 1940s. The station traces its lineage back to a predecessor amateur station, 8MK, which carried the newspaper's reports of the Michigan primaries over two months before the initial KDKA broadcast.
  • African External Service Schedules - Here are several schedules of African stations that had external services transmitting on the international HF bands. They are: ELWA, circa 1962; Ghana Broadcasting Corp., 1961 (tnx Tom Carten, Wilkes-Barre, PA) and 1969; Radio Brazzaville, c. 1962; R. Leopoldville, c. 1962 (tnx Bob Schmid, LaPorte, CO); and R. Madagascar, 1973 (one-hour service on 17730 kHz., 100 kw).
  • SORAFOM (Societe de Radiodiffusion de la France d'Outre-Mer) - Tuning through the 60 meter band today, it is hard to imagine the DX that could be heard on those frequencies 50 years ago. Among the best sources of signals were the stations in the countries of what was then called French West Africa and French Equatorial Africa. By 1960, most of these countries had become independent, and their stations were affiliated with SORAFOM, Societe de Radiodiffusion de la France d'Outre-Mer, a French government organization formed in 1956 to aid development of broadcasting in the former French territories. Here is a schedule of the SORAFOM stations as of September 30, 1960. As can be seen, most of the shortwave transmitters were 4 kw. units. Despite this low power, many were routine catches on east coast afternoons.
  • "Facts About the BBC" - This booklet was published by the BBC circa 1961.
  • "The Voice of America At 25" - This pamphlet was issued by the VOA in 1967 on its 25th anniversary.
  • "NBC Around the World" - Here is a pamphlet from 1936 which commemorates NBC's tenth anniversary. It describes the NBC networks ("red" and "blue" in those days), studios and artists, and then discusses NBC global activities. NBC was the source of much of the programming that went out over American shortwave stations in those days, and a good deal of company promotion centered around the shortwave programs that were prepared for reception abroad and the foreign programming that was received here and rebroadcast over NBC domestic stations. You can get the flavor of this in some of the pages in the second half of this pamphlet. A list of NBC network stations, including shortwavers, is on the next-to-the-last page.
  • TI4NRH - Here is a 4-page folder from the well-known early Costa Rican shortwave station, TI4NRH. It contains a typewritten letter dated 1931 from station owner Amando Cespedes Marin to one Milton Carlson, W9FFQ, of Rockford, Illinois, inviting him to listen and urging him to buy ACM's then soon-to-be-published book, "Me and Little Radio NRH," some sample pages of which he enclosed. The printed part of the folder also contains comments from prospective readers of the book, plus a summary of the book's contents. Set your PDF reader for side-by-side viewing for best effect on this one. And look under "Book Reviews" on this site for a previously-posted review of "Me and Little Radio NRH." Here is another interesting TI4NRH artifact (in the "CPRV Gallery"): a 1922 postcard QSL from Ames, Iowa broadcast station WOI-9YI (9YI was its amateur/experimental call). What is noteworthy about it is the handstamp on the address side, "Radio Emisora Ti4NRH Heredia Costa Rica," and the handwritten notation, "Read it too Dec 6-1941," over ACM's signature. What do you suppose caused the recipient of the QSL, who lived in North Dakota, to send it to ACM? And did ACM read it over the air?
  • CKFX, Vancouver, BC, Canada - Here is a collection of materials about station CKFX, Vancouver, BC, Canada, prepared by Harold Sellers. It includes two histories of the station; some 1996 and 1997 notes from Arthur Cushen and Ben Krepp about the station's closing, together with Arthur's 1940 QSL; a 1982 CKFX-CKWX letter to Harold Sellers about the station; photos and diagrams of the station's equipment and its building; and four QSLs from 1934, 1936 and 1956 from the CPRV collection.
  • Radio Canada International Monitoring Station - Here is some information about the RCI monitoring station in Stittsville, Ontario: some technical information about the RCI transmitter and monitoring plants (1987); a description of the monitoring station (1991); and some photos taken at Stittsville. Thanks to Harold Sellers for this.
  • OXZ - A booklet, "Lyngby Radio Calling," which tells the story of Lyngby Radio, OXZ, the Danish coastal station whose history dates to 1904. (Lyngby Radio ceased operating on shortwave on October 1, 2009.) Thanks to Jim Cumbie of Texas for sending this in.
  • Japan Wireless Telegraph Company - Here is a group of postcard views, undated, of Japan Wireless Telegraph Company facilities. The company, a semi-official organization, was formed in 1925 to assume control over the government commercial (utility) radio stations. There are six cards: a map of the country's stations, views of the Kaizo and Fukuoka receiving stations, and views of the Yosami, Haranomachi and Tomioka transmitting stations.
  • E. I. A. R. - Italy - In the 1930s, E.I.A.R., "Ente Italiano Audizioni Radiofoniche," Rome, was Italy's shortwave station. Broadcasting from the Prato Smeraldo site, "2RO" had a well-developed foreign service, as reflected in this June 1937 program schedule.
  • Radio Ghana - No doubt it has been some time since the postman has brought you a schedule for the External Service of Radio Ghana. Here is one for the period January-March 1977. Along with African political news, it contains the schedules for the station's six English services, two French services, and two Arabic services, together with services in Portuguese, Hausa and Swahili. Just reading the frequencies on the back cover reminds us -- not that we need it -- how much the shortwave scene has changed. Ghana's external service began in the early 1960s. In 1977 it was on 6130, 9545, 11850, 15285, 17870, 21545, 21720 kHz. It is hard to believe that it was over 30 years ago.
  • Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corporation - Here is some interesting material on the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Corporation that was received from Martin Hadlow, Associate Professor at the University of Queensland in Australia. Martin was actively involved in the development of the SIBC, and has sent a booklet which he produced commemorating the opening of the SIBC Broadcasting House in 1982, together with a broadcasting-related First Day Cover issued by the Solomons in 1984.
  • VU2ZP - Here is an interesting historical item from VU2ZP, an early Armed Forces Radio Service station located in Bangalore, India, in the "China-Burma-India" theater. A mediumwave station, it operated on 1355 kc. There is some history about the station on the web at http://cbi-theater-1.home.comcast.net/~cbi-theater-1/roundup/roundup122745.html and http://www.cbi-history.com/part_vi.html.
  • The Voice of Denmark - Here is a file containing three issues of "The Voice of Denmark," a quarterly newsletter published by that station's shortwave department. Included are the newsletter's first issue, published in the fourth quarter of 1958, plus issues from the third quarter of 1959 and the first quarter of 1961. Intended to appeal to a broad audience, there were articles in English, Danish and Spanish. The 1958 issue contains an introduction to the station and a description of the English department; the 1959 issue has an article (and photo) of WRTH publisher (and Voice of Denmark DX bulletin preparer) O. Lund Johansen; and the 1961 issue contains a photo of Hans Hansen, the "Saturday Night Club" host at the time. Each issue contains a schedule of the station's shortwave broadcasts.
  • CHNX, Halifax, Nova Scotia - Harold Sellers has written an interesting history about this former Canadian shortwave station that many listeners will remember operated on 6130 kHz.
  • OTC, Leopoldville, the Belgian Congo - The Congo, both the Belgian and French parts, offered some of the most interesting listening in the 1950s and 1960s, with OTC located in the former, and Radio Brazzaville in the latter. During the war, both had served as the colonial voice of their home countries. Afterwards, they retained a certain autonomy, broadcasting to the world from their exotic locations. The pamphlet we have posted from OTC appears to have been issued around 1949, and contains information about Belgium, the Congo, and the station itself. Part of Radiodiffusion Nationale Belge, OTC broadcast with 50 kw. Its audience orientation made it a favorite among shortwave listeners everywhere, and it often carried special programs for particular clubs. As noted in the pamphlet, it had DX programs in multiple languages, and OTC received so many letters from Sweden that it had a regular program in Swedish. It lost its distinct identity in 1952, after which it served as a relay of Brussels until Congolese independence in 1960 brought its closure.
  • Radio Australia - In "days of yore," many of the larger SWBC stations issued informative printed schedules to listeners on their mailing list. Some of these contained extensive program, time and frequency information. Here is one such schedule from Radio Australia. This one is from April 1951 (it was issued quarterly).
  • More on Biafra - Here is a recording of the Voice of Biafra made by Al Sizer on September 8, 1969, at 2140 UTC on 6145 kHz. Al introduces the recording, and notes that it was made on a DX-150 receiver. The station IDs as "the Voice of Biafra, the external service of the Biafra Broadcasting Corporation," and the IDs are at 2:26 and 3:12. Thanks to John Herkimer for the recording.
  • America Calling All Peoples - A pamphlet published by NBC's "International Division" in 1941. Before the VOA was created in 1942, American shortwave broadcasting was in private hands, and NBC (an offspring of RCA) was one of the leaders. Operating 50 kw. WRCA and WNBI from Bound Brook, New Jersey (later operated as WBOU until it closed in 1966), the NBC "International Division," which consisted of 65 people, broadcast to Europe and South America. Although clearly intended for promotional purposes, this piece contains some interesting history and evidences the national mood at the time, and the belief in the efficacy of international broadcasting. Of special interest is the "Addenda" (blue pages) at the end. It was added after Pearl Harbor, which apparently occurred while the pamphlet was being printed. The author, Earl Sparling, is not otherwise identified, but a quick Google/New York Times search indicates that there was a writer/newspaperman by that name who wrote novels, and also wrote on business topics, in those years.
  • This is London Calling! - Here is a pamphlet from the BBC titled "This is London Calling!" As shortwave stations around the world become an endangered species, it is worth recalling a time when a station issued a special booklet to promote its North American service. Such was the case with this item from the BBC. The BBC "brings you the voices of the men and women of Britain, speaking to you while the sirens wail in the streets and the gunfire roars in the London sky." It was on for six hours every night. "Help us to make the North American Service more widely known. Pass this folder to your friends or send us the names and addresses of those you think would like to have information about the BBC short-wave programmes." While undated, the names and events suggest that the pamphlet was issued during 1940-41. (The BBC North American service was set up in 1940.)
  • WOC, Davenport, Iowa - Here is a pamphlet called "A Personally Conducted Visit Thru WOC, Davenport, Iowa." This was the famous Palmer School of Chiropractic station, which, according to a 1925 issue of RADEX (Radio Index), operated in the broadcast band on 620 kc. (RADEX says the power was 1,500 watts, but the pamphlet says the transmitter was a 5,000 watter; see p. 22.) What makes this item interesting is the detail it contains about the station's appearance and operation. On the DX side, from p. 26: "At the time of our visit to WOC, Sweden, France, Holland, Russia, Italy, Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and the Samoan and Philippine Islands were numbered among the more distant points having reported reception, and many of these points, we were advised, tune in for the programs regularly and are seldom disappointed." The pamphlet is not dated, but its reference to the station having been on the air for three years would make it circa 1925. Could it be true, as mentioned on p. 27, that the station received over 100,000 letters in its first year, and that as many as 20,000 were received in a single week?!
  • "Radio and the Spanish War" - Here is an article from the May 1938 issue of Radio News. We were reminded of this article when we recently received a nice e-mail from an ontheshortwaves follower in Spain who recognized the signature of his grandfather as the veri signer on Roger Legge's 1937 Radio Gurdia Civil (Spanish Morocco) QSL shown in the CPRV QSL Gallery. It is indeed a small world.
  • Here is a brief, readable history of Radio Canada International. This pamphlet was prepared by RCI on the occasion of its 50th anniversary, and covers the years 1945-1995. It is printed in both English and French; these are the English pages.
  • More TI4NRH - More on one of the very earliest and most famous SWBC stations, TI4NRH in Costa Rica. This is from the Fall 1930 issue of Radio Design, the house organ of the Pilot Radio & Tube Corp., Lawrence, Massachusetts, makers of the early "Wasp" series of shortwave receivers.
  • August Balbi/Universal Radio DX Club - Here is an article authored by August Balbi that appeared in the 25th Anniversary edition of the Universalite, the bulletin of the Universal Radio DX Club, December 1958. Balbi was one of the greatest of the old timers, and this article relates some early DX history and much still-valid advice on various subjects.
  • Four Articles from Radio Amateur - Here are four short articles, with photos, from several 1952-53 issues of the British publication Radio Amateur, which carried some shortwave broadcast news, including features. These articles are about the "new" Radio Canada Centre in Montreal; the Voice of Denmark; the Swiss Shortwave Service; and OTC and ORU, the Belgian National Broadcasting Service stations in the Belgian Congo and Belgium respectively.
  • TI4NRH - An article written by its "Creator, Constructor and Program Director," Amando Cespedes Marin, and published in the July 1933 issue of Short Wave Craft. Although "NRH" started out with 7-1/2 watts, it was up to 150 watts by the time the article was written. It was widely heard throughout the world, and Sr. ACM was a well-known figure among DXers. For more on this station, see Don Moore's excellent article about his visit to the station, and other material about TI4NRH, at http://www.swl.net/patepluma/phistory.html
  • Radio Swan - A two-part article on Radio Swan that was published in Popular Communications in November and December 1985. Thanks to PopComm for permission to post these. [Radio Swan-Part 1] [Radio Swan-Part 2]
  • Radio Euzkadi - "The Mysterious Radio Euzkadi," Don Jensen's history of this Voice of the Basque Underground in Spain which appeared in the May 1983 issue of Popular Communications magazine. Also, from the collection of the Committee to Preserve Radio Verifications, a 1968 Euzkadi QSL and a recording of the station's ID from 1969.
  • WUMS was one of the longest operating pirates, usually heard on the broadcast band. Here is the full story, courtesy of Popular Communications, plus a 1948 WUMS QSL from the Committee to Preserve Radio Verifications.
  • Voice of America Brochures - Here are some multi-page pamphlets issued by the VOA. [Pamphlet 1] [Pamphlet 2] The VOA Greenville facility was inaugurated in 1963. Here is a pamphlet that was issued by VOA at the time.
  • Radio Biafra - How many remember the original Radio Biafra from 1967-70? Read about it in Don Jensen's September 1987 Popular Communications article, "The Life And Death of Radio Biafra," posted with permission of PopComm.
  • "PCJ, Short Waves and Long Distances" - Here is a pamphlet issued by the the Philips radio station, early precursor to Radio Netherlands, from around 1929.
  • The Deutscher Kurzwellensender - The Deutscher Kurzwellensender, Berlin, was one of the most powerful shortwave broadcasters in the 1930s. Here is a German-English copy of their May 1938 program schedule for "Zone V, North America," including a 1933 quote from Herr H. himself.
  • Jacko, the Broadcasting Kookaburra
  • Early U.S. Broadcasting - Bob LaRose of Escondido, CA has sent along three interesting articles concerning early U.S. "relay" broadcasting. While the emphasis in two of the articles is on the technical side, all articles provide interesting insights on how leading elements of the broadcast industry viewed international shortwave at the time.
  • Is This the Oldest Catholic Radio Station in Latin America? by Michael Dorner.
  • "London Calling the World." - Here is a copy of a pamphlet titled "London Calling the World." It originated in 1943 and describes in words and pictures the news prduction process for BBC overseas broadcasts at the time. It was published with the approval of the BBC, but apparently was authored by "The British Council" as one of its "Britain Advances" series covering "some of the things in which Britain has contributed notably to modern progress."
  • "That Dragon Goebbels," a 1944 address to the Empire Club of Canada by S.J. DeLotbiniere, from the August 2007 Ontario DX Association bulletin, Listening In.
  • Portishead Radio - Here is a well-illustrated history of the U.K. maritime station Portishead Radio from Jim Cumbie and his 1998 QSL from the station (which closed in 2000).
  • Jim Cumbie of Dallas, Texas has sent in some interesting items about U.S. shortwave stations. They are in three collections: (1) WRUL-WYFR, consisting of two 1956 WRUL schedules and a brief history of WRUL's successor, WYFR; (2) KGEI, a Spanish-language brochure (with English translation) about the famous station, a brief KGEI history taken from the April-May 1985 of FEBC Broadcaster, and a KGEI QSL from 1955; and (3) Dixon, a history of the former VOA station in California.
  • Radio SEAC, Ceylon - In the past we have posted some material about Radio SEAC in Ceylon. Here is a copy of the January 1948 issue of the station's "Forces' Radio Times," including the "BBC General Overseas Service" supplement. Check out the poem, "Radio Seduction," on the last page.
  • KFKX, Hastings, Nebraska - A pamphlet issued circa 1923 by "Westinghouse Repeating Station" KFKX, Hastings, Nebraska. KFKX was built in connection with the experimental use of shortwave (c. 3200 kc.) at KDKA to send KDKA's broadcast band signal to the KFKX area, where it was rebroadcast on both the broadcast band and shortwave (2730 kc.), the latter intended for pick up by KGO in California. Although the pamphlet makes no mention of the Hotel Clarke in connection with the station, part of KFKX was once located there, as indicated on this postcard view of the hotel (which, judging from the cars, looks like it was issued around the same time as the pamphlet)
  • Broadcasting and the Australian Post Office, 1923-1973 - Here is a brief but very nice (and illustrated) history of broadcasting in Australia published in 1973.
  • KGEI - An ontheshortwaves supporter in California has sent along some interesting drawings related to KGEI, San Francisco. He used to work near KGEI, and obtained some drawings from the 1940s and other artifacts from FEBC when they closed KGEI. -- Drawing No. 1 is an NBC drawing showing KGEI probably as it was installed. No. 2 is the title block in the lower right hand corner of the drawing and No. 3 is the revision in the upper right hand corner. -- No. 4, "Proposed Additional Antennas" aimed at Asia and Australia, dated December 5, 1941, is the most interesting (remember what happened two days later). Knowing that the State Department asked GE to put a station on the air to counter Nazi propaganda in South America, and knowing that KGEI's antennas were directed to South America, why was KGEI thinking about expanding west? No. 5 is a detail of the drawing title. -- No. 6 is probably "as built" during the war with both KGEI and KGEX. Note the barracks; the site was guarded. Nos. 7 and 8 are details from the drawing.
  • WJZ - Here is an interesting booklet from BCB station WJZ, New York City, with transmitters in Bound Brook, New Jersey. This is actually a QSL--see the handwritten verification statement on the inside front cover. There is also mention of shortwave on pages 10-11 and page 15. This is probably vintage 1924 or thereabouts.
  • WTAS - Here is a 1924 booklet from WTAS, located at the Villa Olivia estate near Elgin, Illinois and broadcasting on 286 meters, circa 1050 kc. This pamphlet is a great window into various aspects of radio life in 1924. Check out the "Ten Radio Commandments" on p. 13. And if you're in the neighborhood, use the free pass for a station tour!
  • Armed Forces Radio Service - DXer Tetsuya Hirahara in Tokyo sends along some photocopies obtained at the National Diet Library in Tokyo. These are the radio broadcast authorizations issued by the American GHQ/SCAP (Supreme Commander Allied Powers)-Far East Command for AFRS transmitters in Japan (three SW) and Pyongyang (one MW) in 1949 and 1950. I believe 4860 and 9605 kc. were the stations that had been known as "WVTR," the main AFRS station that been operating in Tokyo since the end of the war (see "CPRV QSL Gallery" for their QSL).
  • KDKA - Here is a 1928 pamphlet from KDKA containing a list of American and other stations, photos of the KDKA facilities and station personalities, and a time line of KDKA "firsts." Note the references to pioneer stations KFKX and 8XK on page 2. Rather than enter his dial settings in the spaces provided, this listener preferred to make his notes on the cover!
  • NHK Japan 1940 - Here are some excerpts from the June 1940 edition of the monthly schedule of NHK-Japan. This issue commemorated their fifth anniversary of overseas broadcasting. Included is a brief summary of their first five years, their schedule, some letters from listeners, and a map showing the number of listener letters received during the five year period.
  • Miscellaneous Radio Items 1972-74 - Walt Salmaniw of Victoria, British Columbia, has been doing a little shack cleaning and sent some scans of some interesting miscellaneous things from the 1972-74 period. These are (1) a Saudi Arabia schedule; (2) an envelope from Difusoras del Uruguay; (3) a Radio Liberty schedule (with sites); (4) an envelope with a Canadian SWL International imprint; (5) and two views of a schedule from Radio Cordac, Bujumbura, Burundi (side 1, side 2).
  • Forces Radio Times - Produced by the (British) Forces Broadcasting Service, M.E.L.F. (Middle East Land Forces), in conjunction with the BBC, Cairo, and showing the program lineup for September 15-21, 1946. Times and frequencies for many of the "J" stations are shown. Most are medium wave, but note the daily schedule for "Middle East Short Wave Station JCKW," 7220 kc., at the bottom of each page. FBS via R. Athens is featured on the last page, along with programming for Indian troops over MW station JFPB in a place called . . . Basrah. Also, see "The CPRV Gallery" for QSLs from JCKW (Jerusalem, 1945) and FBS-MELF (Malta HQ, 1949).
  • BBC - Here is a brochure promoting the North American Service of the BBC. This pamphlet probably dates from the 1950s.
  • KDKA North Canada Service - In the 1920s, Westinghouse transmitted programs to the Canadian north by way of the experimental shortwave channels of some of their AM stations, specifically KDKA-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, WBZ/WBZA-Boston/Springfield, Massachusetts, and KFKX-Hastings, Nebraska. Here is a brochure about the service, produced by the Oblate Fathers circa 1927, along with an accompanying postcard.
  • VNG - Some photos and a recording from VNG, the Australian time signal station that was often heard until its close on December 31, 2002.
  • Postcards - Here are some postcard views of stations: WLW; Broadcasting House in Oslo, Norway, 1949; a radio station in Motala, Sweden; a 1942 view of the RCA "Radio Central" at Rocky Point, Long Island, New York; an undated view of the broadcast house in Berlin; and an undated postcard of a station in China.
  • More Postcards - More station postcards: two 1935 views of the facility of WCAU, Philadelphia; two views of PRA8, Radio Clube de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazill: and another view of the RCA transmitting facility at Rocky Point, Long Island.
  • Station ID Sheet - A sheet from Radio News containing info on IDs and interval signals from shortwave stations. This appears to be from the 1930s.
  • Jim Cumbie of Texas sends along an article from Radio News, May 1927, ("Short Waves in Siberia") about a combination utility-amateur station in Tomsk, Siberia.
  • A drawing, sent along by Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, from Revista Telegrafica, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1927, on the occasion of the worldwide broadcast of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony by Philips station PCCJ.
  • A 1947 schedule in Portuguese from Radio Clube de Angola.
  • BBC Broadcasting House 1944 - A picture of the cover of a 1944 BBC Spanish language leaflet showing Broadcasting House.
  • Estacion Paradizabal - Cover of Argentine magazine 'Revista Radiotelefonica,' 1922, showing a drawing of the antenna of the first station in Montevideo, Estacion Paradizabal, located on the roof of the Hotel Florida - from Horacio A. Nigro, Uruguay.
  • A photo from Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, from an 1947 Argentine magazine showing the control room for a station in "Gold Coast, Africa" that may be the predecessor to the current Ghana Broadcasting Corporation.
  • "The BBC's original plans for its relay stations on Ascension Island and the Seychelles" by Alan Davies, Southeast Asia.
  • A brochure from 1961 celebrating the 5th anniversary of ELWA, Liberia.

RECORDINGS

  • More Vintage Recordings - Here is another group of recordings mostly made by Larry Magne in Philadelphia circa 1972. They are [ID locations are in brackets]: 1) Austrian Army Radio Station ("Schulungssender"), Vienna, 6255.3 kHz., October 1971, 0600 UTC [:01]; (2) Voice of Truth (Greek Communist Party), 7335.3 kHz., circa 1972 (recorded by Bernard Chenal-France) [:37]; (3) Radio of the National Liberation Front of the Republic of Guinea (anti-Sekou Toure clandestine), 4969.8 kHz., c. 1972 [:06, 1;18, 2:25]; (4) Radio Portugal Livre, 8333 kHz. (probably via Romania), c. 1972 [1:00, 1:55, 2;10]; (5) ORTF, Cayenne, French Guiana, 3385 kHz., March 1972, 0915 UTC [1:12]; (6) Radio Curom, Curacao, 17513 kHz. (audio source for government radiotelephone transmitter), April 1972, c. 1730-1830 UTC [1:14, 2:46]; (7) Far East Broadcasting Association, Victoria, Seychelles, test transmission on 11950 kHz., November 1971, 1825 UTC [:01, :40, 1:21]; (8) Radio Tahiti, Papeete, Tahiti, opening with an English ID and "English by Radio," 15170 kHz., May 1972, 0300 UTC [1:15]; and (9) Action Radio, Guyana Broadcasting Service, Georgetown, Guyana, 3290 kHz., March 1972, 0845 UTC [02:28]. Thanks to Larry for permission to post these.
  • Ecuador II - Here is another group of recordings of stations "never-again-to-be-be-heard-on-SW" from Ecuador. These date to the years 1975-1981. ID locations are in brackets. The stations are: 1) Escuelas Radiofonicas Populares, Riobamba, 3985 kHz., 1976 [:04, :11]; (2) La Voz de los Caras, Bahia de Caraquez, 4795, 1976 [:14]; (3) La Voz de Saquisili y R. Libertador, Saquisili, 4900, 1978 [1:02, 1:17]; (4) La Voz del Rio Tarqui, Cuenca, 3285, 1981 [02:03]; (5) Ondas Quevedenas, Quevedo, 3325, 1975 [:01, :07, :16]; (6) Ondas Canaris, Azogues, 5046, 1978 [01:28]; (7) R. Centinela del Sur, Loja, 4892, 1976 [:48]; (8) R. Federacion, Sucua, 4960, 1976 [01:16, 01:59]; (9) R. Luz y Vida, Loja, 4831, 1977 [:08]; (10) R. Nacional Progreso, Loja, 5060, 1980 [01:26]; and (11) R. Rio Tarqui, Quito, 4972, 1976 [:51].
  • Ecuador - Here are 13 recordings of shortwave stations in Ecuador. ID locations are in brackets. All these stations--indeed all shortwave broadcast stations in Ecuador save for the reduced-footprint HCJB--are now off shortwave. The recordings are: (1) Compania Radiodifusora del Ecuador (C.R.E.), Guayaquil, 4765 kHz., 1980 [1:21, 3:42]; (2) Emisora Gran Colombia, Quito, 4911, 1976 [:32]; (3) Ondas Azuayas, Cuenca, 4980, 1979 [:18]; (4) Rdif. Casa de la Cultura, Quito, 4930, 1976 [:17]; (5) R. Cenit, Portoviejo, 4722, 1975 [1:12]; (6) R. Cuenca, 5950, 1976 [:39]; (7) R. Iris, Esmeraldas, 3380, 1977 [:02, 1:45, 2:23]; (8) R. Melodia, Quito, 3375, 1976 [:18]; (9) R. Popular, Cuenca, 4800, 1976 [:30]; (10) R. Rio Amazonas, Macuma, 4870, 1976 [:12]; (11) R. Splendit, Cuenca, 5026, 1976 [:12, :29]; (12) R. Tropical, Esmeraldas, 3340, 1979 [:15, :56]; and (13) R. Zaracay, 3390, 1977 [:17].
  • Radio Australia - It was a bad week. It looks like Radio Australia, as well as the Northern Territory Shortwave Service (Alice Springs, Katherine, Tennant Creek), are no more. One of the selling points for preserving these services was their ability to provide emergency broadcasting during cyclones. We have posted two examples. The first is a recording of a Shepparton relay of local ABC Brisbane programming during Cyclone Larry in March 2006. The second is a Shepparton relay of ABC Far North programming during Cyclone Monica in April 2006. Both were heard on 6020 kHz. In the case of Monica, a letter to the Cairns office of ABC Far North brought a nice reply with some interesting information, including an ABC Far North folder on tracking cyclones and staying safe. Radio Australia had been providing emergency broadcasting services for many years, as evidenced by a QSL for the Shepparton relay of mediumwave 8DR-Darwin, which had lost its transmitter during Cyclone Tracy, Christmas 1974. The 8DR programming was sent to Shepparton where it was relayed back on shortwave for the benefit of the 30,000 Darwin evacuees and also for the surviving Darwin mediumwave stations, which picked it up and relayed it. The Radio Australia shortwave transmitters in Darwin, which had come on the air in 1968, were also knocked out, and returned to limited service only in 1979. Some 71 people died in Cyclone Tracy.
  • Radio Free Europe - In the 1970s (and earlier), Radio Free Europe was a very different animal from what it is today. It operated almost exclusively on shortwave, and there were five language services: Bulgarian, Czech, Hungarian, Polish and Romanian. For a long time, jamming of RFE by Soviet bloc countries was intense. In the higher bands, such as 16 and 19 meters, you would move from jammer to jammer as you tuned across the band. There were, however, some periods when jamming was suspended, usually in connection with detente or some other event that reduced east-west tensions. Here are some ID-IS recordings of the RFE languages (sans Hungarian), made in 1977-78: Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, and Roumanian Services. RFE would also broadcast an occasional English program, such as the one we have posted from 1980 in the RFE Czech service ("You are listening to a Czechoslovakian samizdat commentary on the Czechoslovakian service of Radio Free Europe").
  • Test Transmissions-III - (1) The first is a test from the Imo Broadcasting Service, Owerri, Nigeria, 4755 kHz., heard on May 20, 1979 at 2259 UTC. (QSL) (2) The second is from "Super Rock" KYOI, Saipan, Marianas Islands, 11900 kHz., heard on December 18, 1992, 1159 UTC. "Yoi" means "good" in Japanese (Japan was the country's target zone). The programs were prepared in California. KYOI was not a commercial success--the boom in Japanese shortwave listening had already passed. The Christian Science Church bought the station in 1987; it later became KHBI. (QSL) (3) Finally, we have a recording of Adventist World Radio, Madagascar, during a special test broadcast on May 3, 1998, 0300 UTC, 3215 kHz., 7.5 kw. This was an interesting event, as powerhouse WWCR, which used the frequency at the same time, agreed to clear the chanel for a half hour so that AWR could be heard on May 3 and again on May 10. (QSL) We have posted some entries from the Numero Uno newsletters from April 12-May 17, 1998, which give the background to the tests. The recording contains the WWCR sign off at 0257, and the AWR programing as heard (poorly) at 0324 [:22].
  • Test Transmissions-II - (1) Radio Metropolis, Prague, Czech Republic, 6200 kHz., November 27, 1994, 2328 UTC. Radio Metropolis was a short-lived private station. (2) KWHR, Naalehu, Hawaii, 9930 kHz., testing at 1126 UTC on December 19, 1993, their first day on the air. Formal inauguration was on Christmas Day. (QSL) (3) WGTG, McCaysville, Georgia, 7355 kHz., testing its 50 kw. homebuilt transmitter at 2140 UTC on July 29, 1995, their first day of tests. The station would morph into WWFV, then WWRB. (QSL) (4) Radio Minurca (UN Mission), Bangui, Central African Republic, 9900 kHz., November 13, 1998, 2104 UTC. Radio Minurca had been on FM for about four months when it commenced use of this 20 kw. shortwave transmitter, operating at about 12 kw. It left the air on February 1, 2000. (QSL)
  • Test Transmissions-I - There was always something exciting about shortwave test transmissions. They were a special connection between station and listener where the station told the listener explicitly that it wanted to hear how its signal was doing. Here are four of these tests from times past. They are: (1) An early test broadcast from Africa Number One, Moyabi, Gabon, 500 kw., October 1, 1979, 21495 kHz., 1050 UTC. This includes the announcement of the drawing [01:25] where they were offering a Peugot (won by someone from Ivory Coast) (QSL). (2) A multi-lingual ID for a Radio Japan test broadcast via Moyabi, July 8, 1983, 15405 kHz., 0515 UTC [English 01:19, 03:31] (QSL). (3) Adventist World Radio, Forli, Italy, with a special DX broadcast to North America using 2.5 kw. on 7240 kHz., September 28, 1997, 0338 UTC (QSL). (4) And Radio Mediterranean, Valetta, Malta, 5960 kHz. January 15, 1983, 2206 UTC. To get the most from these recordings, boost the treble on your equalizer (QSL).
  • Clandestine Stations - Long before founding Passport to World Band Radio, Larry Magne was an active DXer in Philadelphia. Here are some interesting clandestine stations of the day heard by him and some other DXers. They are all from circa 1972. (1) Radio Peyk-e-Iran ("Courier of Iran," the Tudeh Party [communist], anti-Shah station that transmitted from 1957 to 1976, mainly from Bulgaria [three clips]); (2) Voice of the Malayan Revolution (11730 and 15790 kHz, operated by the Malaysian Communist Party, with transmitter believed to be in China [four clips]); (3) Radio Free Russia (NTS) (an anti-Communist, Germany-based clandestine station operated by the National Alliance of Russian Solidarists, a right-wing Russian emigre group whose roots went back to 1930); (4) Radio Espana Independiente (voice of the Spanish Communist Party in exile, transmitting from Budapest, 9833 kHz. [two clips]); (5) Bizim Radio ("Our Radio," run by the Turkish Communist Party and transmitted from East Germany and Romania [recorded in France]); and (6) Liberation Radio [English ID], the Vietcong station (Voice of the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam, operating from various Southeast Asian locations, including North Vietnam). Thanks to Larry for permission to post these.
  • Chile - Chile is off SWBC now, but the stations of yore were usually fairly well heard. Here are audio clips of 13 Chilean stations. The numbers in brackets are the ID locations on the clips. The stations: (1) R. Agricultura, Santiago, 9630 kHz., 1978 [1:32, 2:01]; (2) R. Calama, 6100, 1981 [:19, 1:01]; (3) R. Colo Colo, Santiago, 14530 (utility station pickup), 1978 [:30, 3:01]; (4) R. Cooperativa de Santiago, 9690, 1977 [:40, :59, 1:24, 1:44, 1:58, 3:04]; (5) R. Esperanza, Temuco, 6089.9, 2002 [:14, :31]; (6) R. Mineria, Santiago, 9750, 1977 [1:11, 2:06, 2:14]; (7) R. Nacional del Chile, Santiago, 6195, 1976 [:34]; (8) R. Patagonia Chilena, Coihaique, 6080, 1980 {:38 English, 2:50]; (9) R. Portales, Santiago, 9570, 1977 [:20]; (10) R. Santa Maria, Coihaique, 6029, 1985 [:31]; (11) R. Universidad, Coincepcion, 6135, 1976 [:10, :56]; (12) Voice of Chile, Santiago, 15130, 1977 [:21 English]; and (13) Voz Cristiana, Santiago, 21550, 1998 [:51 English].
  • Radio Syd, Banjul, Gambia - During the 1950s and 1960s there were many special shortwave broadcasts arranged by Scandinavian DX clubs. Years later the practice continued on a reduced basis, usually as part of a major DX contest. One such DX event was sponsored by Sweden's Grangesbergs Radio Club in connection with the 1984 Nordic Open DX Championship. The club arranged a special half-hour shortwave broadcast from Radio Syd, Banjul, Gambia, a station not normally on shortwave. Radio Syd had a long history, having operated for years as an offshore mediumwave pirate in Europe. In 1968 it relocated to Gambia and went ashore. The station's history was recounted by Al Muick in "Radio Syd--the Trip from Denmark to the Gambia," PopComm, August 1983 (p. 49); and also at http://www.cwgsy.net/private/offshorepirateradio/radiosyd.html. At 2000-2030 UTC on September 21, 1984, R. Syd transmitted a special broadcast on shortwave utilizing the facilities of Gamtel (ex-Cable & Wireless), on 7422 kHz. for the first 15 minutes, 7485 for the rest, power 6 kw. Although information on the transmission was distributed only to contestants, word got out to others a few days in advance of the transmission. Reports were to be sent to the club, which printed and filled out the QSLs and then dispatched them to Gambia for mailing. Some 300 reports were received. Here is a recording of the last 11 minutes of the broadcast, as heard in Massachusetts, including English IDs at 02:17, 05:33, and 08:57, plus a file containing the "official" QSL and also a letter received directly from the station.
  • Paraguay & Uruguay - Here are two countries that were always good catches when they could be heard. There are six recordings, one from (1) R. Nacional del Paraguay, Asuncion, 9737 kHz, April 4, 2004, 0858 UTC (ID :59); and five from broadcasters in Montevideo, Uruguay: (2) Emisora Ciudad de Montevideo, 9560.5 kHz, October 25, 1996, 2058 UTC (ID :16); (3) R. Carve, 6155 kHz, June 3, 1979, 0937 UTC (ID :22); (4) R. El Espectador, 11835 kHz, December 28, 1976, 0910 UTC (ID :10); (5) R. Sport, 11835 kHz, April 1, 1978, 1009 UTC (ID :07 & 1:13); and (6) S.O.D.R.E. (in English), 9515 kHz, October 19, 1977, 0354 (ID :44).
  • "Vasily's Christmas Special" - This holiday program was broadcast by Radio Moscow on December 22, 1991 with host Vasily Strelnikov. These were the days of glasnost and perestroika, and I doubt that anything like this had ever gone out over Radio Moscow before.
  • Dominican Republic II - Here are some more Dominican Republic recordings (all Santo Domingo except where indicated; IDs at indicated seconds): Onda Musical, 4766 kHz, 1997 (:15); Radio Antillas, 5955, 1986 (:26); Radio Comercial, 4882 kHz, 1976 (:10); Radio Earth over Radio Clarin, 11700 kHz, 1983 (:13); Radio Mil, 4930 kHz, 1975 (:19); Radio Pueblo, 5010 kHz, 2002 (:04); Radio Revelacion, Puerto Plata, 2480 kHz (MW harmonic), 1996 (:18); and Radio Villa, 4960 kHz, 1999 (:10).
  • Dominican Republic - In 1937 there were 20 shortwave stations broadcasting from the Dominican Republic. Today there are none. Here are some recordings of Dominican Republic stations of the past, specifically these (all in Santo Domingo except where indicated; numbers in parens. indicate location of ID): La Voz de las Fuerzas Armadas, 4825 kHz, 1976 (:24); Radio Amanecer, 6025 kHz, 1987 (:11); Radio Clarin (English), 11700 kHz, 1977 (:54); Radio Clarin (Spanish), 4850 kHz, 1976 (:11); Radio Discovery, 6215 kHz, 1986 (:23); Radio Norte, 4807 kHz, 1975 (:04); Radio Quisqueya, 6205 kHz, 1992 (:06); Radio Santiago, Santiago 6048 kHz, 1982 (:14); and Radio TV Dominicana, 9505 kHz, 1977 (:19).
  • ELWA - Most of us remember ELWA, the Sudan Interior Mission station that came on the air from Monrovia, Liberia on mediumwave in 1954, shortwave in 1955, and was last heard on shortwave in 2008. It suffered a serious fire in 2011, and if it is still on the air at all it would likely be FM only. Here are some graphics and two songs from an LP record produced by ELWA and issued in what appears to be the early 1960s. You will find the album jacket, front and back, which depicts a more peaceful time in Liberia; the labels on the record, and two songs: "Give the Winds A Mighty Voice" (the melody used as the ELWA tuning signal), and a Yoruba Chorus selection called "Sounds of Africa," narrated by station staff member Joseph Gbadyu. In its heyday, ELWA had a North America service and was widely heard on many higher frequencies in addition to its final shortwave channel of 4760 kc. This record brings back fond memories of a friendly shortwave voice from the past.
  • WFAT - Although shortwavers generally think of U.S. pirates as operating in the 6 and 7 MHz. bands, "modern" pirating actually began circa 1976 just above the end of the broadcast band, 1600 kHz. One of the first of the pirates was WFAT. Some of these stations were fairly widely heard, and their mastery of telephone loop technology permitted them to take listener phone calls while on the air. They provided early encouragement for the development of community-oriented broadcast band and FM pirate radio. Here are a couple of audio clips from WFAT, 1620 kHz (and 3240), made in January 1979, circa 1000 UTC. (It is a 12-minute recording; stick with it, the audio improves.) WFAT was operated by Perry Cavalieri, and was transmitted from a public housing project in Brooklyn. The station was also featured in this New York Times article, "The Sound of Silence on WFAT, Pirate Radio," April 21, 1979, a week after the station was closed down.
  • Colombia II - Here are some more recordings of Colombian shortwave stations from the past (IDs at :xx): Brisas del Citara, Quibdo, 4895 kHz., 1976 [:55]; Colmundo Bogota, 6065 kHz., 1997 [:19 and many other places]; Ecos del Atrato, Quibdo, 5020 kHz., 1976 [:12]; Ecos del Combeima, Ibague, 4787 kHz., 1975 [1:13]; Emisora Kennedy, Bogota, 4775 kHz., 1978 [2:41, 3:01]; Emisoras Nuevo Mundo, Bogota, 4755 kHz., 1976 [:11]; Idea Radio, Bogota, Bogota, 7380 kHz., 2001 [:29, and 1:24 in English]; La Voz de la Selva, Florencia, 6170 kHz., 1976 [:15]; La Voz de los Centauros, Villavicencio, 5990 kHz., 1976 [:24]; and La Voz del Centro, Espinal, 6095 kHz., 1978 [:19].
  • WGEO-WGEA Recorded Announcements - When shortwave broadcasting began in the United States, two of the earliest stations were General Electric's 2XAF and 2XAD in Schenectady, New York. These became W2XAF and W2XAD, and were widely heard throughout the world. In 1939, when stations exchanged their "X" calls for regular four-letter calls, they became WGEO and WGEA. WGEO operated with 100 kw. and was the most powerful American shortwave broadcaster at the time. WGEO and WGEA went into full-time VOA service when the federal government took over all U.S. shortwave broadcasting in 1942. The VOA stateside stations continued to announce their own call letters and their corporate parentage long after that, however. Here is the audio of five original 33-1/3 rpm LP records which were used by WGEO-WGEA for giving announcements. You can click on the "play button" for each label to hear the audio from that record. In general they are short announcements, in English except where otherwise noted, with the same announcement repeated in multiple tracks on the same side of the record. The exact dates of most of the recordings is unclear. However, one label is marked 1/1/46 and another is marked 5/19/58.
  • "BIT-Broadcasting Identification Tape" - In addition to the annual World Radio TV Handbook and Summer Supplements, World Publications (Hellerup, Denmark) produced other books and materials of interest to the radio listener. In the 1965-66 How to Listen to the World (p. 159), 1966 WRTH (p. 66) and 1966 WRTH Summer Supplement (p. 43), advertisements announced the release of "BIT-Broadcasting Identification Tape," a one hour reel-to-reel recording featuring the interval signals and identifications of over 60 shortwave stations. The stations were grouped on the tape alphabetically, by continent, with a brief introduction before each clip. Here are two separate mp3 files (Side 1 and Side 2 of the tape). Thanks to the World Radio TV Handbook for permission to post this.
  • Peru II - Here are some more Peruvian recordings (IDs at :xx): (1) R. Chinchaycocha, Junin, 4860, 1976 [:21]; (2) R. Cutervo, 6691, 1986 [:28, 1:00 and 1:17]; (3) R. Libertad de Trujillo, 4910, 1984 [:04]; (4) R. Onda Popular, Bambamarca, 5273, 1987 [:19]; (5) R. del Pacifico, 9675, 1976 [:34]; (6) R. Pucallpa, 6155, 1981 [:21]; (7) R. San Juan de Chota, 5274, 1984 [:19]: and (8) R. Santa Rosa, Lima, 6045, 1976 [:28].
  • Peru - Surely Peru has been one of the most interesting shortwave DX targets. Here are some recordings of Peruvian stations from the 1970s and 1980s, usually during the morning hours following sign on (IDs at :xx): The stations are: (1) R. America, Lima, 9505 kHz., 1977 [:08]; (2) R. Atlantida, Iquitos, 4790, 1976 [:12 and :49]; (3) R. El Sol, Lima, 5970, 1977 [:12 and 2:18, and the "Sol en los Andes" program ID at 1:39]; (4) R. La Cronica, Lima, 9518, 1976 [:44 and :1:11]; (5) R. Los Andes, Huamachuco, 5030, 1982 [:13, :22 and 2:08]; (6) R. La Voz del Altiplano, Puno, 5816, 1984 [:24]; and (7) R. Moyobamba, 5015, 1981 [:24].
  • Radio Canada Shortwave Club LP - Here is a special recording produced in 1974 by Ian McFarland, producer and co-host of the Radio Canada Shortwave Club. Copies were offered as a prize in an RCI Shortwave Club survey contest. (Some copies were also available at various DX gatherings.)
  • BBC-Daventry - Here is a recording of the closedown announcement for BBC-Daventry that was broadcast on March 29, 1992 at 1126 UTC on 15070 kHz., a frequency that had come into use (as GWC) around 1941.
  • Honduras - This time we visit Honduras, and present some station recordings, mainly from the years 1976 to 1978. In those years, unlike now, Honduras had many stations on the air. They were commercial or religious stations, mainly on the 49 and 60 meter bands, and typically signing on around 1000-1100 UTC, when east coast reception was the best. The recordings are: La Voz de la Mosquitia, Puerto Lempira, 4910 kHz. (1981); La Voz del Junco, Santa Barbara, 6075 (1977); La Voz Evangelica, Tegucigalpa, 4820 (1976); Radio Juticalpa, Juticalpa, 4781 (1978); Radio Landia, Comayagua, 4965 (1978); Radio Lux, Olanchito, 4890 (1977); Radio Progreso, El Progreso, 4920 (1976); and Radio Swan, San Pedro Sula, 6015 (1977).
  • Brazil III - These are 90 meter band stations. They are (IDs at :xx): (1) Lins Radio Clube, 3225 kHz., 1980, ID at :54; (2) R. Educadora, Uberlandia, 3345, 1978, IDs at :23 and :36; (3) R. Iguatemi, Osasco, 3295, 1978, ID at :18; (4) R. Nacional de Sao Gabriel, 3375, 1980, ID at :36; (5) R. Tamandare, Recife, 3265, 1978, ID at :19; and (6) R. Tapuyo, Mossoro, 3295, 1977, ID at :16.
  • Brazil II - These are 60 meter band stations heard between 1976 and 1981, and believed now all off shortwave. They are (IDs at :xx): Radio Borborema, Campina Grande, 5024 kHz. (:19 and :43); Radio Maua, Rio de Janeiro, 5055 (:20); Radio Nacional de Boa Vista, 4835 (:08); Radio Por Um Mundo Melhor, Gov. Valadares, 4855 (:20); Radio Relogio, Rio, 4905 (:21); Radio Ribamar, Sao Luis, 4785 (:06); Radiodifusora Roraima, Boa Vista, 4839 (:27); and a recording of Radio Sociedad Feira de Santana, 4765 kHz., recorded by Henrik Klemetz in Sweden in August 1961. Henrik observes that on November 15 of that year, all the programs of R. Soc Feira de Santana were dedicated to their foreign listeners, including himself. He received a tape containing 210 minutes of the event, a short segment of which is posted at http://www.box.net/shared/7i79epxmyb. The speed is a bit slow, but if you download the file and save it, and set Windows Media Player to "fast," it sounds close to normal. Thanks, Henrik.
  • Brazil - Here are some recordings of Brazilian stations from the 1970s and 1980s. For each one we have indicated the place (:XX) where the station name is heard. The stations are: R. Universo, Curitiba, 9545 kHz. (1976--:07); R. Bandeirantes, Sao Paulo, 9645 (1977--:13, :38); R. Marumby, Florianopolis, 9675 (1980--:10); R. Rio Mar, Manaus, 9695 (1976--:26, :40); R. Tupi, Sao Paulo, 11765 (1978--:08, :30); R. Cultura de Porto Alegre, 11895 (1983--:17, :23, :55); R. Record, Sao Paulo, 15135 (1976--:22); and R. Jornal do Comercio, Recife, 15145 (1976--:19, :47).
  • Here are more recordings from Mike Csontos of Lima, New York: (1) HCJB, Quito, Ecuador, 1957 (it's hard to believe that we don't hear this one anymore); (2) KGEI, San Francisco, California, 1959 (during its "Voice of Friendship" days); (3) VOA station WLWO, 1962; (4) ELWA, Monrovia, Liberia, 1962 (when they still had a North American service); (5) WRUL, headquartered in New York City, transmitters in Massachusetts, 1962; (6) TWR-Bonaire, 1964 (a silent voice since 1993); and (7) Radiodiffusion Congolaise, Leopoldville, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1962 - "This is the heart of Africa calling the world." We have also posted a promotional sheet issued by the Congo station in 1961 (this from the Roger Legge collection in CPRV). Thanks again, Mike.
  • We are posting some nice recordings made by Mike Csontos of Lima, New York during the years 1956-1964. He was using a Hallicrafters S-40B, his first shortwave receiver, which he purchased new in 1954 from Fort Orange Radio in Albany. His listening post was near Schenectady, New York, and he was using a 200-foot longwire antenna. These recordings bring back some great memories. They are: (1) Radio Canada, 1956 (when they were still using call letters); (2) OZF, the Voice of Denmark (New Year's Eve, 1956; that is Marianne Linard's voice); (3) Radio Australia, 1957 (also with call letters); (4) the Swiss Broadcasting Corp., 1957 (more call letters); and (5 & 6) two recordings from Radio Brazzaville, "I" from 1958 and "II" from 1962.
  • Colombia - Here are some recordings from Colombian SW stations. Most of these were made in the 1970s, which doesn't seem that long ago, except that all of them, and nearly all the other Colombian stations that once populated the 60 and 49 meter bands, are now long gone from SW. Included in this group are: (1) La Voz del Caqueta, Florencia, 5035 kHz. (1976); (2) La Voz del Huila, Neiva, 6150 kHz. (1976); (3) Ondas del Darien, Turbo, 6085 kHz. (1976); (4) R. Bucaramanga, 4845 kHz. (1977); (5) R. Guatapuri, Valledupar, 4915 kHz. (1975); (6) R. Mira, Tamuco, 6015 kHz. (1979); and (7) R. Sutatenza, Bogota, 5075 kHz. (1977). Also in the group is a more recent recording, Ecos del Orinoco, Puerto Carreno, testing on 4905 kHz. in 1995. Did anyone ever QSL them?
  • Venezuela - Here are some recordings of Venezuelan shortwave stations made in the 1970s. They are: La Voz del Tigre, 3255 kHz. (1976); La Voz de Carabobo, 4780 (1975); Ondas Panamericanas, 3215 (1976; weak, ID at :40); Radio Lara, 4800 (1975); Radio Universidad, 3395 (1975); Radio Puerto La Cruz, 3365 (1978); Radio Tricolor, 4820 (1976); Radio Angostura, 6120 kHz. (1975); Radio Barcelona, 3385 (1976); Radio Carora, 4910 (1976); Radio Frontera, 4760 (1976); Radio Monagas, 3325 (1976), Radio Trujillo, 3295 (1975); Radio Valles del Tuy, Ocumare del Tuy, 6129 kHz. (1982); Radio Sensacion, Caracas, 5999 kHz. (1980); Radio Tachira (in English), San Cristobal, 4830 kHz. (1983); Radio Nacional (also English), Caracas, 15400 kHz. (1978); Radio Libertador, Caracas, 3245 kHz. (1975); and R. Maracaibo, 4860 kHz. (1975).
  • U.S. Shortwave Stations - Here are some recordings of some of the U.S. shortwave stations that came on in the 1980s. Most were made while the stations were still testing. WRNO was the first commercial SWBC station approved by the FCC since WINB came on the air in 1962, and the others followed. The recordings are: WRNO, New Orleans, Louisiana, 11965 kHz., 1982; KCBI, Dallas, Texas, 11790, 1985; WHRI, Noblesville, Indiana, 11780, 1985; WCSN, Scotts Corner, Maine, 6160, 1987; KUSW, Salt Lake City, Utah, 15225, 1988; and WWCR, Nashville, Tennessee, 15690, 1989.
  • Clandestine Stations - If there was a "golden age" of DXing clandestine stations for North American listeners, it began in the late 1970s when numerous stations opposed to the governments in Nicaragua, Cuba, and El Salvador took to the air. Most operated in and around the 40 meter ham band and suffered interference accordingly. Here are some that may bring back memories. From Cuba--R. Abdala, 7085 kHz., November 1977; R. Libertad Cubana, 7092 kHz., January 1980; La Voz de la Alpha 66, 7050 kHz., August 1980; and La Juventud Progresista Cubana, 7055 kHz., March 1981. And the Nicaraguan FSLN station, R. Sandino, 7702 kHz., recorded on June 13, 1979, about a month before the Somoza government fell. Added: A recording of R. Sandino made by Rich McVicar on July 17, 1979, the day the Somoza government fell.
  • Radio Australia Mailbag Program - Every SWL who was listening from the late 1940s to 1980 remembers the Radio Australia mailbag program, which was hosted by Keith Glover for 25 of those years. Here is a recording of the last mailbag show, aired on December 28, 1980.
  • Here are a few audio clips from Jerry Berg of stations that have "gone dark" on shortwave: from Haiti, 4VEH, 9770 kHz, 1977, and R. Citadelle, 6156 kHz, 1979; from El Salvador, R. Nacional de El Salvador, 9553 kHz, 1980; from Martinique, France Region 3, 3315 kHz, 1976; and from Belize (formerly British Honduras), R. Belize, 3285 kHz, 1977.
  • 1982 Falklands War - Some memories of the 1982 Falklands war with audio clips of the British "Radio Atlantico del Sur," Argentine "Liberty" (or "Argentine Annie" as she was called), and the Falkland Islands Broadcasting Station. Along with the audio clips are QSLs for the stations heard during that period.
  • The "Tupamaros" - Here are 2 historic audio clips recorded by Horacio Nigro of radio broadcasts of the "Tupamaros" - "Movimiento de Liberacion Nacional," a subversive leftist group that flourished in Uruguay in the 1960s and 70s.
  • XMHD - A 78 rpm record (undated) that was apparently used as a promotional item for a station in Shanghai, China, XMHD, the China Christian Broadcasting Association.
  • Nicaragua - Some recordings from Nicaraguan stations no longer on shortwave.
  • CQM, Emissora da Guine in Bissau, Portuguese Guinea - The days when stations in the Portuguese colonies could be heard on shortwave are long gone. Jerry Berg heard Emissora da Guine in Bissau in 1959 on 7948 kHz. and sent them a reel-to-reel tape which they over-recorded and returned to him. Here is the station's recording along with Jerry's QSL of the reception.
  • Windward Islands Broadcasting Service - Revisiting a station of the past and its successors, Radio Free Grenada and Radio Grenada. Included are several recordings by Jerry Berg and Ed Shaw along with two QSLs from the station.
  • Radio Free America was Dr. Carl McIntire's "pirate" station that broadcast briefly over 1160 kHz. from a former mine sweeper off the New Jersey coast. Here is a recording from Larry Magne, Editor-in-Chief of Passport to World Band Radio, from September 19, 1973.
  • Here are additional recordings from Bob LaRose: R. Luxembourg (1973), R. Mexico (1969), R. Pakistan (1969), R. RSA, South Africa (1969), and R. Stantsiya Rodina, USSR (1969).
  • Here is a recording from Jerry Berg of Radiodiffusion Congolaise, Leopoldville, 1961, along with the letter and a photo of English announcer Althea Campbell who can be heard on the recording.
  • Here are some more recordings from Bob LaRose, namely R. Peyk-e Iran (1969), R. Espana Independiente (1969), R. Euzkadi (1969), and R. Libertad (1969, an apparently CIA-run anti-Castro station).
  • Bob LaRose of Escondido, CA has sent along some nice shortwave station recordings that he made mainly during the years 1968-69. Featured this week are a R. Cairo test to Europe (June 1969); HISD, Dominican Republic (1969); R. Station Peace & Progress, USSR (1969); XERH, Mexico (1968); and a nice Christmas greeting (and reference to the Apollo 8 mission) from WNYW, New York (1968).
  • One of the most listened to letter programs back in 1958 was "Saturday Night Club" from OZF, the Voice of Denmark, on 9520 kHz. Here is a recording of program host Marianne Linard sending greetings to Jerry Berg, along with a picture of her from the 1958 World Radio Handbook. Boost the treble on your mp3 player for best audio on this one.
  • Stations of the Past: La Voz de Galapagos, Ecuador, 4810 kHz, December 8, 1985, and Radio Los Andes, Huamachuco, Peru, 5030 kHz., December 7, 1985; both submitted by ace Latin American DXer Henrik Klemetz of Sweden who was in Ecuador when he recorded them.
  • ELWA, although the station has now become a fairly rare catch on 4760 kHz, older listeners may recall the days when ELWA operated major international services over its 10 and 50 kw transmitters in Liberia, including a Tuesday night (local time) broadcast to North America. The station was founded in 1954 and was widely heard in the years thereafter. In July 1961, Jerry Berg sent them a taped reception report on a new frequency they were using at the time, 11975 kc/s. Much to his surprise, on their North American request program of September 5, 1961, host Jim Pelley featured his report and played his recording over the air. He also sent him this studio recording of the program. What is novel (in addition to hearing Jerry when he was 17 years old) is that they played his tape recording over the air. So you can hear not only the September 5 program, but within it Jerry's original tape of their signal as he recorded it on July 25, 1961.
  • ETLF, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, a 100 kw., station, was established by the Lutheran World Federation in 1963. Jerry Berg heard them and sent them a taped report (those were the days of 3" reel-to-reel tapes), and in reply they sent him a tape containing their ID and some Ethiopian music. This is part of that tape. ETLF was taken over by the government and became the Voice of Revolutionary Ethiopia in 1977.
  • The late Arne Skoog was the DX Editor of Radio Sweden's venerable DX program, "Sweden calling DXers," for many years. Here is his voice in a tape recorded message sent to Jerry Berg circa 1961.
  • Radio SEAC, Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), operated from 1944 to 1949 to provide entertainment, news and a link with home for servicemen in the Southeast Asia Command. We are indebted to Eric Hitchcock of the U.K. for providing this rare recording of a Sunday night U.K. beam of R. SEAC. This is from disks cut in the R. SEAC studio.
  • A recording of WLWO, Bethany, Ohio, July 20, 1959, at 1630 UTC on 15250 kHz .
  • A recording of Voice of America, Tangier, July 20, 1959, at 2030 UTC on 15295 kHz .
  • A recording of Voice of Free Korea from 1961 on 11925 kHz at 0530 UTC, recorded in Japan by NSB "DX Time" Producer Jun Kato.
  • A recording of "The Dragon Show," Voice of Free China (BCC), Taiwan from 1961 on 6095 kHz at 1130 UTC, recorded in Japan by NSB "DX Time" Producer Jun Kato.
  • A recording of Radio Liberty (via Taiwan) from 1961 on 9720 kHz at 0700 UTC, recorded in Japan by NSB "DX Time" Producer Jun Kato.
  • A recording of FEN-Japan, on 6155 kHz, made some time in 1961 at 0100 GMT, recorded in Japan by NSB "DX Time" Producer Jun Kato.
  • "The Amazing World of Short Wave Listening" - In 1959, the Hallicrafters Company produced this 14-minute, 45 rpm promotional record, narrated by noted "Man on the Go" journalist Alex Dreier.
  • BBC's "This is London", 50th anniversary recording. Horacio Nigro in Uruguay has posted on his webpage at http://www.angelfire.com/my/radiohobby/bbc50a.html the audio of an English-language vinyl record issued by BBC on its 50th Anniversary (1982). It is narrated by Mr. Leo McKern, and each side is nearly half an hour. The files are in RealAudio (.rm) format. Open the Real Player, go to "File," "Open Location" and paste the link http://www.angelfire.com/my/radiohobby/bbc50a.rm for side A and http://www.angelfire.com/my/radiohobby/bbc50b.rm for side B. The webpage also shows the contents of both sides. Various historical events are featured, with commentary about various aspects of the BBC itself. This webpage was originally created by Horacio to help a DX colleague on the Hard-Core DX List who asked for BBC historical audio.

SWLING & DXING

  • Boys' Life Radio Club - We have already posted some Boys' Life Radio Club DX certificates and an article reprint. Here is a file with two other Boys' Life items: a 1950s magazine advertisement for the Boys' Life Radio Club, and the SWL card that was made available to members.
  • "BBC Monitoring Service--A Layman Looks at Caversham Park" - What DXer of the 1960s and 1970s didn't dream of tuning around on the receivers of the BBC Monitoring Service at Caversham Park, or just clipping on to one of their antennas? Although "BBC MS" became less secretive as the hush-hush years of World War II receded, it wasn't until 1972 that Caversham opened itself up to a visit from DXers. Alan Thompson and Martin Hall were the lucky ones, and here is Alan's 12-page monograph on what they found.
  • Samuel J. Murphy Station List - The records that DXers kept in the 1920s were often just notations in a published list, like White's Radio Log or RADEX, but sometimes they were more elaborate. Samuel J. Murphy of Philadelphia kept a separate daily listing of the stations he heard on his one-tube Atwater Kent setup. These were broadcast band stations. Here is a copy of Sam's typed list for a year starting on April 7, 1923.
  • 1935 Reception Report - It is easy to forget that, before wordprocessing and e-mail, QSLing was an entirely manual process of laboriously typing individual letters to stations, and awaiting their reply via the postman. Reports could become formulaic, and so it is nice to see the chatty and personalized style adopted by one listener, Miss Geraldine B. Chandler, in her 1935 report to PRF5, Comp. Radio Internacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, which is shown in her correspondence with the station that is posted here. Geraldine's report covered her reception of July 20 and July 22, 1935. The station acknowledged her report over the air on August 12 (she didn't hear it), and replied to her by mail on September 4, sending her a book of Brazilian songs, autographed by the the manager of the radio division of the Dept. of Propaganda, which produced the program. It looks like they also sent her a Christmas card. After a long hiatus, Geraldine wrote to the station again--on February 13, 1937--where we learn that she lived in Brookline, Mass., near Boston, and that the location where she had been listening in July 1935 and from which she had sent her report--Rockport, Mass.--was her summer address. That her reception was, as she said, better there than in Brookline is no surprise, since Rockport--still a popular summer vacation destination--is right on the water. Except for the absence of information about her receiver and antenna, the report would be a credit to any DXer. Her transcription of the PRF5 station announcement appears to be virtually verbatim.
  • More SWL Cards - Years ago practically every SWL had an SWL card. It was used mainly as a convenient way to send reports to amateur stations. But even if you didn't report to hams, you probably used your card to mail short messages to others (there was no e-mail then, of course), or you might have swapped your card with other SWLs (card swapping was very popular), or used it as a report stuffer. We don't usually think of the utilitarian SWL card as being especially eye appealing, but sometimes they were, and this was especially true in the 1930s. Here is a collection of a couple of dozen SWL cards from that era. Most were sent to DXer Peter Clarius, a few to Roger Legge.
  • SWL Cards - You don't see SWL-cards much anymore, but for decades they were in wide use by SWLs, mainly for reports to hams but also for swapping and as report stuffers to broadcast stations. Here is a file containing eight distinctive SWL cards. The cards: (1) This is an Australian DX Radio Club card from 1940. The ADXRC was the first DX club in Australia, formed in 1933. Note the "G. Hutchins" in the design below the tree. Hutchins was the second DX editor for "Australian DXers Calling," the Radio Australia DX program. (2) The second card, which dates from 1931, shows the name and logo of the New Zealand Short-Wave Club. The club's full name was the New Zealand Short Wave Radio Club, and it operated from 1930 to 1937. (3) The 1938 card from "Dialer" John L. Ballin shows the logo of the Globe Circlers DX Club. (4) The 1940 card from Jack Towne of Redding, California shows the logos of the Short Wave League, sponsored by Short Wave Craft magazine, and "R9LL," which is believed to be the R9 Listeners League of America, origins unknown. (5) M. A. Adkins of Union, New York identified himself on his 1938 card as "T-CLP," the Tri-Cities Listening Post. (6) Anthony C. Tarr of Seattle, Washington was a well-known SWL of the 1930s and a shortwave editor for RADEX magazine. (7) Joe Becker of Hamilton, Ohio, who called himself "The Hamilton Night Owl," was a long-time BCB DXer of the 1930s and 1940s and a member of the NRC board of directors. (8) John T. Harris of Paris, Kentucky modestly called himself "K.F.R.S.," "Kentucky's Foremost Receiving Station."
  • Marjorie Lee Dodd - Here is an article describing the 1927 broadcast band DX activities of Marjorie Lee Dodd of Hollywood, California. Marjorie died in 1979, and her radio notebook was discovered by her aunt by marriage, who was the executor of Marjorie's estate. The article appears in the March 2011 edition of Antique Radio Classified and appears with their permission (www.antiqueradio.com). Can anyone solve the 6XT mystery?
  • DX Reports - It hardly needs saying that SWLing was a lot different nearly half a century ago than it is now. To give you an idea how different, here are some 1965-66 DX reports from two well-known DXers, Bob Hill, who was living in Boston in 1965 and Washington, DC in 1966, and Bob LaRose, who was listening from Binghamton, NY in 1966. These detailed reports reflect a common practice of active DXers in those days--preparing periodic (weekly or monthly) reports of their catches and sending copies to relevant clubs, newsletters, magazines and individuals. It was all paper, of course; e-mail had not even be imagined. Thanks to "the Bobs" LaRose (now living in San Diego, CA) and Hill (Littleton, MA) for permission to post these.
  • Radio Golf - Here is an article by Harold Sellers on the origins of "Radio Golf." It appeared in the March 2010 Ontario DX Association bulletin, Listening In.
  • The Day You Had To Pay - Radio Receiving Licenses in Canada by Dan Greenall, from the April 2007 Ontario DX Association bulletin, Listening In.
  • The "WPE" Monitor Registration Program - From 1959 through 1970, Popular Electronics magazine sponsored a "Monitor Registration" program for radio listeners. This article is a look back at the program through the years and the familiar "WPE" callsigns many of us had.
  • 1954-55 Boy Scouts of America reprint - Here is a 1954-55 Boy Scouts of America reprint of some SWL articles that appeared in Boy's Life magazine at that time. This 16-page pamphlet will bring back memories for American SWLs who may have been starting out in shortwave around then. The pamphlet includes a long article by Ken Boord about SWLing and the stations you could hear, including such long ago targets as Radio Brazzaville, 4VEH, Radio Noumea, Radio Jamaica, the Portuguese Azores, Radio Trinidad and the British Far East Broadcasting Station. Also shown is a two-tube kit receiver that could be obtained through the Boy Scouts, and information about ham radio. Also, here is an original Boys' Life Radio Club award ("Logged All Continents").
  • Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, sends along two scans of a Philco Spanish language log card designed for medium wave.

CLUBS & PUBLICATIONS

  • NNRC 1938 Constitution & By-Laws - Most shortwave clubs tried to operate in a democratic fashion, but they usually became "key man" operations. The Newark News Radio Club was probably the best-structured of all the clubs. Here is a copy of their 1938 Constitution & By-Laws.
  • The Junior Radio Guild - Here is an article about the Junior Radio Guild, which functioned during the years 1928-31.
  • "Treasure Island All-Wave Radio Log" - We have already posted material about the two 1939 DX conventions in San Francisco: the "IDA DX Festival," July 8-11, which was sponsored by the International DXers Alliance; and the "World DX Convention," July 11-14, which was sponsored (or at least promoted) by the Universal Radio DX Club. Now we have another piece of DX memorabilia, issued in connection with the July 11-14 meeting: the "Treasure Island All-Wave Radio Log." The inside spread is a "Western World-Wave Station Log," listing many shortwave stations, with times and frequencies, along with a list of English-language news broadcasts. The outside pages contain broadcast band information. The exact origins of this item are unclear. The cover says it was compiled by "the western representatives of the country's leading DX Radio Clubs." Inside, comments to an unnamed "Secretary" at a Berkeley, California address are solicited. Treasure Island was the San Francisco location of the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition ("world's fair").
  • "Ama-Touring" - Roger Legge is usually remembered as a shortwave broadcast DXer. However, while not an amateur operator himself, he was also an active ham band listener and editor of ham band DX news. Starting in early 1937, Roger edited "Ama-Touring," a then-new standalone supplement to the monthly Globe Circler bulletin of the International DXers Alliance. The assistant editor was LeRoy Waite (who would serve as NNRC amateur editor from 1952 to 1969). "Ama-Touring" was moved into the bulletin proper in the summer of 1940, replacing the club's mediumwave coverage. The IDA closed in July 1943. "Ama-Touring," with Roger as editor, reappeared in May 1955 as a column in Popular Electronics magazine. But its life there was short, lasting only until January 1956. Here are three copies of the IDA "Ama-Touring" (with a few graphics added). They are from May 1939 (incorrectly marked May 1937 in the original masthead), March 1940, and May 1940. We have also posted Roger's introductory "Ama-Touring" column in PE.
  • "World DX Convention" July 11-14, 1939 - Some time ago we posted information about the "IDA DX Festival" in San Francisco, which was sponsored by the International DXers Alliance on July 8-11, 1939. It must have been a big week for DXers in that city, for the Universal Radio DX Club sponsored its own "World DX Convention" on July 11-14, right after the IDA gathering. Here is a URDXC brochure about the convention. The URDXC, the "Pioneer Radio Club of the Golden West," had a long life. It operated from 1933 to 1961. The convention brochure contains some interesting history of the club, which, as can be seen, had some colorful members, not the least of whom was "Count Alexis (Ollie) Ross" of Vallejo, California, who surely must have written his own bio. For more on Count Ollie, read this article by Bob Ballantine, W8SU.
  • The New Zealand DX-Tra - The first major DX listeners club in New Zealand was the New Zealand DX Club. It traced its roots to Radio Record magazine in 1929 and became independent ten years later. For many years, Arthur Cushen was the shortwave editor of the club's monthly bulletin, The New Zealand DX-Tra. Here is a copy of the bulletin from January 1946. As you can see, much of it focused on mediumwave reception. The NZDXC closed in 1948.
  • International Short Wave League - Pt. III - In December 1951, Short Wave News announced that henceforth the International Short Wave League would be an independent organization rather than a project of the magazine. To wrap up our coverage of the ISWL, we have posted that announcement, together with two later copies of the ISWL bulletin (September 1965 and June 1967.) The bulletin was called "Monitor." It is worth noting that even after the club separated from the magazine, Short Wave News continued its own coverage of SWBC DX listening. (The magazine became The Radio Amateur in 1952.). The ISWL lives on http://www.iswl.org.uk/.
  • International Short Wave League - Pt. II - Continuing our coverage of the International Short Wave League, here is a file containing samples of the monthly report on shortwave broadcast DXing that was published in ISWL's parent magazine, Short Wave News. At first the column was called "Around the Broadcast Bands," edited by the unnamed "Monitor." Later the name was changed to "Broadcast Bands Commentary," and still later "Broadcast Bands Review." These columns are from the years 1946 to 1953. (Short Wave News magazine became The Radio Amateur in 1952.) Also we have posted a photo of the very nice ISWL pin that club members could purchase.
  • International Short Wave League - Pt. I - This time we start a three-part series of postings about the early days of the International Short Wave League of the U.K. (not to be confused with the International Short Wave Club, which was also based in the U.K. after World War II). The ISWL was formed in 1946, not as a separate club but as a project of Short Wave News magazine, which was founded in January of the same year and published by Amalgamated Short Wave Press of London. Although increasingly the focus of both the League and the magazine became amateur and technical topics, they offered good coverage of shortwave broadcast listening as well. Each month one or more pages of the magazine was devoted to League activities, which were many and varied. Here is a file containing the magazine's introduction of the League (in October 1946), and the "League" pages from a dozen Short Wave News issues from 1946 to 1951. (Short Wave News became The Radio Amateur in 1952.)
  • Midwest DX Club - The Midwest DX Club was born circa 1968. Its key man, and Executive Editor of the club bulletin, was David R. Alpert of Morton Grove, Illinois. MWDXC was an all wave club, and a member of ANARC. Here are two copies of the club's monthly bulletin, MWDXC Journal, one from 1971 and another from 1972. The club closed in July 1973, by which time it had over 100 members.
  • Victory Radio Club - DXing dropped off sharply during World War II. Some major clubs closed up shop, and the rest were just getting by. One club that started during the war was the Victory Radio Club. It was formed in 1942 by the editors and reporters of Radio Index (RADEX), a popular DX magazine which had ceased publishing that year. The club was headquartered at first in Worcester, Massachusetts (Ray LaRocque), later in Latrobe, Pennsylvania (Art Hankins). It covered mainly the standard broadcast and the shortwave broadcast bands, and it published a bulletin--at first called Victory News, later just DX--and, in the earlier days, a VRC Flash Sheet. Members participation fell off, however, and the club was absorbed into the Universal Radio DX Club in 1946. Here are several issues of the club's bulletin: December 5, 1942; November 5, 1945; February 4, 1946; and July 1, 1946.
  • More Universal Radio DX Club - Previously we had posted a 1956 copy of the Universalite, bulletin of the Universal Radio DX Club. Now we have gone back another decade and posted two earlier issues, one from June 1, 1945 and another from November 1, 1946. Many of the top DXers of the day belonged to the URDXC.
  • World Communications Club CONTACT - The World DX Club (UK) closed at the end of 2012. In 1968 it had replaced the World Communications Club, which had itself, in 1965, been a new incarnation of the two year-old Sudbury World Communications Club. Through it all the name of the bulletin remained CONTACT. Here is a copy of the July 1967 issue of the World Communications Club CONTACT (at which time the bulletin was edited by Alan Thompson).
  • United 49ers Radio Society - One of the popular if lesser known shortwave clubs of the 1950s was the United 49ers Radio Society. It operated from 1949 to 1954 and covered SWBC and ham listening. Here are three of the club's bulletins from those days: August-September 1952, March 1953, and September 1953.
  • Universal DX Club - The Universal Radio DX Club (URDXC) is well-remembered in DX history, but do you remember the Universal DX Club (no "Radio")? It was active in the 1930s. Here is a copy of the UDXC's bulletin for March 1, 1938. Like most of the clubs of that era, it covered both shortwave and the broadcast band. Note on the first page the innovative plan for boosting membership, which apparently was not successful--the club was absorbed by the NNRC later in the year. On page 3 there is reference to the BBC's Arabic program, and the expectation that it would soon start broadcasts in Spanish and Portuguese. These were the first foreign-language broadcasts from the BBC, which transmitted only in English until Arabic started up on January 3, 1938 (Spanish and Portuguese followed on March 14).
  • "Hearing All Continents" is a well-established mark of achievement among shortwave listeners. Where did the concept come from? The answer may be the International Short Wave Club, which was established in 1929. In the December 1931 issue of the club bulletin, International Short Wave Radio, a member suggested the idea. The club picked it up and set up a program for an HAC award for verified reception of stations on all continents. Two years later, in December 1933, the editor observed that while the award had thus far received little support from the membership, new interest was then being displayed. The rules evolved over time, and were layed out in detail in the October 1936 issue of the club bulletin. Thanks to ontheshortwaves supporter Bob Ballantine of Warren, Ohio, we have also posted the HAC certificate of ISWC member Harry V. Miner. Miner's name is listed in the 1936 bulletin among the HAC recipients at the "6 stations per continent" level. The certificate is from a later stage in Miner's DX career, as it contains nine seals (9 stations per continent).
  • Canadian DX Relay was a Canadian club about which not very much is known. According to information in some old copies of RADEX (Radio Index) magazine, CDXR was formed circa December 1932. A year later the club had 40 members and annual dues of $1.75. The club president was Fred H. Bisset of Goderich, Ontario. The bulletin was "all wave"--shortwave, BCB and ham, and It appears that it was issued weekly during the BCB DX season, twice a month otherwise. Sponsoring DX contests and arranging for special BCB DX broadcasts were major club activities, and the club supplied members with thank you cards to be sent to stations making DX broadcasts, even if the member sent no reception report. Here are two copies of the CDXR bulletin, January 29 and February 26, 1936.
  • Chicago Short Wave Radio Club - Here is another copy of "Short Wave Radio Reception News," DX newsletter of the Chicago Short Wave Radio Club. This one is from August 8, 1935.
  • "RADEX Radio Map of the World" - In addition to the magazine, which was published from 1924 to 1942, RADEX (Radio Index) occasionally issued other DX-related items. Here is the "RADEX Radio Map of the World." It is dated 1932, which was early in the history of shortwave (it was the year the BBC Empire Service was inaugurated.) The "RADEX Radio Map of the World" measured 11" square, and was of four-sided, fold-out design. On the front was a time converter wheel. You set it at your time, and you could then read the time in other countries (or vice versa). On the back was a list of countries, their radio prefixes and time zones. (Time zones were considerably less standardized then.) Inside was a map of the world.
  • Toledo Radio Club - We posted an article, "Leaves From A DXer's Scrapbook," from the May 1939 RADEX (below). It contained a discussion of local clubs, including the Toledo Radio Club. Here is a copy of their club bulletin, some related SWL cards, and a holiday card from club President Ray Lewis. The bulletin is dated August 11, 1936.
  • "Leaves From a DXer's Scrapbook" - For many decades, at least before the internet, national clubs were the major way for SWLs to stay in touch with one another. However, club membership was often supplemented by gatherings of local DX groups. Such groups have existed for many years, as evidenced by this article from the May 1939 issue of RADEX (Radio Index) magazine. It reviews the activities of some of the local groups of the day. The author, "Count de Veries," was the well-known BCB DXer Carleton Lord.
  • International DXers Alliance DX Festival - The IDA DX Festival was held in San Francisco, July 8-11, 1939. The festival coincided with the Golden Gate International Exposition, i.e. the 1939 World's Fair (one of them--there was also a New York World's Fair that year). Here is a file containing various articles in The Globe Circler (the IDA journal), and several promotional pieces put out by the IDA, about the festival. As you can see, there was a special IDA broadcast over General Electric Treasure Island shortwave station W6XBE (later KGEI), and a train trip from Chicago for those wishing to make the trek west by rail. If we read the third to the last item in the file ("Editorial") correctly, it look like IDA president Charles A. Morrison made the trip by car but missed the convention! Per the next item, attendance was an inspecific "goodly number," if "somewhat smaller than expected." An August convention in Downers Grove, Illinois drew more than 40 people.
  • "Newark News Radio Club--The Very Early Days" - It recently came to light that the Newark Evening News, parent to the venerable Newark News Radio Club (originally the Newark News DX Club), is available on microfilm. A review was made of some copies of the paper from the years 1927-28, when the NNRC was born, and some from 1931. Here is a 15-page summary, with graphics, covering what was found.
  • National Radio Club Shortwave Columns - We tend to forget that the National Radio Club, which today is a mediumwave-only club, once covered shortwave as well. It was founded as mediumwave-only in 1933, but the NRC bulletin had a shortwave column as well from 1935 to 1944 (and a ham band listening column from 1937 to 1940). Here is a file of eight NRC shortwave columns from 1943, specifically the January 9, February 27, March 6, April 24, May 15, June 19, July 17 and August 14 columns. Back then the bulletin was published weekly during the DX season (October through March), monthly otherwise.
  • Another NNRC History - The NNRC was long an important part of American DX history and here is yet another history of the venerable club. This one is from the January 1937 issue of All-Wave Radio magazine. It is written by Bernard Ahman and gives the flavor of the club's early years.
  • NNRC "Historical Musing" - We have already posted a number of histories of the NNRC (below). Here is an "historical musing" by NNRC member Arthur E. Forester. It appeared in the December 1935 issue of RADEX. It contains some interesting memories of the club's early days (the club was eight years old in 1935), with a focus on the Courtesy Programs Committee, which was a major NNRC activity. Up until December 1935 the club had been devoted entirely to broadcast band DXing. It was that same month and year that the first shortwave column appeared in the NNRC bulletin.
  • NNRC "Statistics" - From Jim Cumbie of Texas, here is the "Statistics" column from the December 1956 issue of the Newark News Radio Club Bulletin
  • Newark News Radio Club - We have posted two copies of the NNRC Bulletin from 1937. The March 22 issue was one of the weekly issues, while the June 15 issue was a monthly. Even in those early years you can see some of the same look and feel that would be familiar to NNRC members decades later.
  • International Short Wave Club - If you were in the know about shortwave in 1931, you were a member of the International Short Wave Club, Klondyke, Ohio. It was early days for shortwave broadcasting, and hard news about stations and frequencies was hard to come by. The ISWC, founded in 1929, was the best source. Here is the January 1931 issue of the club's bulletin. It contained some information about hams and commercial stations too, but SWBC soon became its focus.
  • "Globe Circler" - Earlier we posted a couple of 1930s copies of this bulletin of the International DXers Alliance. This time we are posting another copy, the club's last. This is the July-August 1943 issue. See page 7 for the notice that the club was suspending publication. Although hope was expressed that operations would resume after the war, that never happened. This issue gives a good idea of the breadth of stations that could be heard at the time. Charles A. Morrison was bulletin editor (and club president), and as the masthead on page 3 indicates, well-known shortwavers A. Balbi and G. Ferguson (no doubt August and Grady) were associate editors.
  • Radio Canada Short Wave Club - Here are a few issues of the bulletin of the Radio Canada Short Wave Club, including the last issue (January-February 1971): No. 25 - Sep 1969, No. 30 - Feb 1970, No. 38 - Jan-Feb 1971. The corresponding bi-weekly Saturday program of the same name started in 1962. The club president was S. Basil (Pip) Duke, a Londoner (U.K.) who had an extensive military, engineering, and broadcasting background before joining the CBC in 1954 and becoming Supervisor of Engineering Services for the CBC's shortwave broadcasts. From 1967 to 1971 the club had a regular bulletin with news about the CBC International Service, member profiles and lists of members seeking pen pals, member loggings, shortwave-related features and the like. The club left the air in 1975. RCI introduced a weekly "DX Digest" in 1977 (it became "SWL Digest" in 1981).
  • New Zealand Radio DX League - In honor of the club's 60th anniversary, a special supplement to the October 2008 New Zealand DX Times has been published. It contains several interesting items about DXing in New Zealand: the very first issue (October 1948) of the New Zealand DX Times; "The Origins of DXing in New Zealand" by Barry C. Williams; a two-part article, "The Great Mob," by Frank Glen; "My Great DX Hobby" by the late Jack Fox; "Radio New Zealand International: The Voice of New Zealand, Broadcasting to the Pacific" by Andrew M. Clark; and "This Radio Age--The Biggest Little Programme in International Broadcasting," which summarizes the show's content for 1953. A higher resolution copy of the supplement may be found at http://www.worldfm.co.nz/radiodx.com/DXTimes/Supplement. Thanks to the NZRDXL for permission to post this interesting material on ontheshortwaves.
  • Newark News Radio Club - If there is a shortwave club that was entitled to call itself "venerable," it was the Newark News Radio Club. It traced its roots back to 1928. Alas the end for the NNRC came in April 1982. Here is that month's bulletin, the club's last. The introductory message from President Eugene Vonderembse explains the situation as it was. Of particular interest is Hank Bennett's column, where he reprises his years with the club. The announcement from Charles Wackerman (page "BCB Supplement") led to the formation of the Association of DX Reporters, which remained in operation until 1995.
  • Quixote Radio Club - Here is what appears to be the first issue of Short Wave Reporter, the monthly publication of the Quixote Radio Club of Santa Barbara, California, which issued a weekly bulletin between its founding in 1933 and October 1936, the date of this issue. As you can see from the introductory pages, the club offered some interesting services. The data in the text list starting on p. 6 looks like the kind of thing that any DXer of the day would be happy to have (note that it is arranged by station call letters rather than alphabetically by country). The "F.B." log shows the stations that were operating every 10 kc.; each issue covered one or more different bands.
  • Universalite - Here is a copy of the July 1956 issue of the Universalite, bulletin of the Universal Radio DX Club. Founded in 1933, and in operation until 1961, it was usually published monthly, twice monthly from October to April. The club was run by Charles C. Norton of Hayward (later Vallejo) California. By the post-war years, broadcast band coverage had been dropped and, as this issue illustrates, the bulletin was split between SWBC (including utility stations) and amateur listening. Over time, ham band coverage declined and SWBC coverage increased, and by the late 1950s the URDXC was principally a SWBC club. Among its shortwave editors were such well-known DXers as Marvin E. Robbins, Al Niblack, Robert J. Hill, David Morgan, John A. Callarman, William F. Flynn, Ernest R. Behr, and C. M. Stanbury II.
  • Club bulletins really convey the DX environment of their day. Here are two copies of the Globe Circler, bulletin of the International DXers Alliance, which was headquartered in Bloomington, Illinois. They are from March 1934 and February 1936. As with many DX clubs, the early emphasis was on medium wave, with the focus on shortwave increasing over time. This can be seen in the shortwave content of these two bulletins, which was much more extensive in 1936 than in 1934.
  • Shortwave Clubs and World War II - It was 60 years ago, in January 1942, that the war had its most dramatic effect on the shortwave listening hobby. The January bulletins of both the International Short Wave Club, headquartered in East Liverpool, Ohio, and the International DXers Alliance, in Normal, Illinois, took note of Pearl Harbor that had occurred the month before, and how things had changed. The ISWC carried on until May 1942, the IDXA until July 1943. Here are a few pages from their bulletins of those days, giving a flavor of the times.
  • 40 Years of the North American Shortwave Association by Don Jensen.
  • A Retrospective on ANARC's Early Years by Richard A. D'Angelo.
  • The Founding of the International Short Wave Club in Klondyke, Ohio by George Zeller.
  • "DX Journal" - Here is an issue of DX Journal, a small newsletter that appeared briefly in 1950. It was edited by Raymond S. Moore, then of Rowley, Massachusetts, who many years later authored the several editions of Communications Receivers: The Vacuum Tube Era.
  • The Dialist - Here is the first issue of the Newark News Radio Club's early publication, the Dialist. The NNRC was formed in 1927, but it did not have its own publication separate from the coverage in the newspaper until 1934 when the Dialist was established. Only six issues were published; in 1935 the Dialist was replaced with the mimeographed NNRC Bulletin that became familiar reading to countless DXers for almost five decades. In 1934 the NNRC was a mediumwave-only club. Shortwave coverage did not begin until 1935. The look and feel of the Dialist is a reminder of how different an era it was, and not just in DX.
  • Newark News Radio Club - Several histories of the Newark News Radio Club that were published in the NNRC bulletin to commemorate the club's 25th, 40th and 50th anniversaries. Also shown is a 1962 newspaper obituary of Irving Potts, President and guiding light of the NNRC, and a photo from 1956 taken at the summer NNRC Convention.
  • More NNRC History - Specifically from the July 1965 issue. One page of that issue contains an interesting summary of some of the newspaper coverage of DX back in 1928, drawn from the Newark Sunday Call and the Newark Sunday News of that year. In addition, the front page of the bulletin contains a reference to a 1932 broadcast from 15-watt Brantford, Ontario medium wave station 10-BQ. It so happens that a recent QSL collection received by the Committee to Preserve Radio Verifications from Sidney R. Steele of Toledo, Ohio contains a QSL from 10-BQ (1933), and also QSLs from Stratford, Ont. station 10-AK (1935) and Wingham, Ont. station 10-BP (1933, 25 watts).
  • More 1951 NNRC Convention - Here is a look at Mapine Farm today, site of the 1951 NNRC convention, in Lansdale, PA.
  • 1951 NNRC Convention - For many years, through 1951, the NNRC held a summer convention at a place called Mapine Farm (Lansdale, PA), which was the home of NNRCers Harold and Mary Robinson. The accompanying report on the 1951 convention describes what these events were like. And from an early NNRC bulletin we have a map of how to get there!
  • "Two Decades of Service to DX-ers" - We have already posted histories of the NNRC written in 1952, 1967 and 1977. Here is another, earlier version written by Carleton Lord and appearing in the December 1947 edition of the NNRC Bulletin.
  • NNRC "High Frequencies" Column, 1942-1945 - Ever wonder what was on the shortwave bands in the 1940s? Here are copies of four NNRC "High Frequencies" shortwave sections from 1942, 1943, 1944 and 1945. Gustav Siegfried Eins-9545, Radio Saigon-11780, Radio Congo Belge-11720, Radio Centre Moscow-15750, VE9AI-9540, XGOY-11900 . . . sigh!
  • Some scans from Henrik Klemetz of early DXing publications, this time two from Sweden. "Sweden Calling DXers," one of the best known DX programs of all time, was on the air from 1948 to 2001 (by then it was called MediaScan). In addition to the weekly radio program, "SCDX" issued a weekly printed DX sheet. Here are pictures of the front and back of No. 187, September 22, 1951. Regarding the music shown on the back, Henrik notes: "This is ALL the music that was broadcast in the course of ONE WEEK on the sole home service channel of Radio Sweden. No wonder Swedes turned to shortwave for some more music."Next are four covers of Nattugglan, or "The Night Owl," which was the first and foremost DX monthly in the late 1940s and early 1950s. The covers are from May 1948, January 1949, January 1950 and August 1951. Also shown is a copy of an advertisement for the World Radio Handbook that appeared in a 1948 issue of Nattugglan.
  • First Canadian DX Relay Convention - Here is an interesting album created by Arthur L. Robb of Topeka, Kansas, the most distant attendee at the First Canadian DX Relay Convention in St. Catharines, Ontario on August 31, 1935. (The Canadian DX Relay was about three years old at the time and billed itself as Canada's only DX club.) Most of the album contains sightseeing photos, neatly mounted and labeled with white ink. However, there are some interesting radio-related items as well: a "Most Distant Visitor" card; an envelope from The Welland House, where the meeting took place; a newspaper article about the meeting; and a photo of CKTB, which provided a tour. The album also contains some post-convention items: 1936 and 1942 newspaper articles about BCB DX specials which Robb reported (KRNR and KRJF), a sheet of Canadian DX Relay stationery, and a "Radio DX Fan" card. The most interesting thing to me is that the authors of the newspaper articles never felt it necessary to explain what "DX" was!
  • "Short Wave Hints and Helps" - Here is a pamphlet from the International Short Wave Club when it was headquarterd in East Liverpool, Ohio. This primer describes the club and gives information on how to identify stations, how and where to send reports, etc. The ISWC operated from the U.S. from 1929 to 1942 and from the U.K. from 1946 to approximately 1970. This pamphlet is undated, but from the station lists I would place it in the mid 1930s. For a fuller history of the club, see George Zeller's article, "The Founding of the International Short Wave Club in Klondyke, Ohio."
  • The American Shortwave Listeners Club is most often associated with Stew MacKenzie who became its Publisher in 1966 and Executive Editor in 1967. However, the club was founded in 1959 by Ken MacNeilage and Maxey Irwin. Here are two early copies of the club bulletin, "SWL," one from January 1960 (the second issue of the bulletin [p. 4 is missing]) and the other from March 1960. Thanks to Bob LaRose for these.
  • The ISWC Anti-Jamming Campaign - After the International Short Wave Club ceased operations in the U.S. in May 1942 and reappeared in the U.K. four years later, its two best known hobby-wide projects would be its periodic shortwave station popularity polls and the ISWC anti-jamming campaign. The anti-jamming campaign was basically a personal project of the club's leader, Arthur Bear. It began in 1956. It was not universally embraced within the hobby, in part due to the stridency of ISWC statements on the subject. Bear named not only the jammers and the western stations that were said to incite the jamming, but also those hobby organizations that did not fully embrace the anti-jamming campaign. Here are four front pages of ISWC bulletins from 1958 which illustrate the tone of the campaign.
  • Sweden Calling DXers - Here are some early "scripts" of "Sweden Calling DXers." The program, which was broadcast over Radio Sweden on Tuesday nights, mailed these two-sided DX sheets to contributors, and they were a valuable source of DX news. SCDX began in 1948. It morphed into MediaScan in the 1980s, but by then was focused on satellite broadcasting rather than shortwave. The editor who was most associated with SCDX is Arne Skoog, who died in 1999. These scripts are from 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1963, and come to us from Bob LaRose of San Diego, California, who was active during the 1960s.
  • Membership Cards & Certificates - Radio clubs flourished in the 1950s and 1960s and members would often receive cards or certificates upon joining. Here is an assortment of membership cards and certificates issued to the late California DXer, Bill Flynn.
  • Chicago Short Wave Radio Club - This club was one of many regionally-based SWBC clubs in the 1930s. Here is a September 1935 issue of its four-page bulletin, Short Wave Radio Reception News, published every two weeks. In addition to brief narrative notes about specific stations heard, it includes a station list, arranged by frequency, showing reception quality over the previous two weeks. If you would still like to join, mail in the membership form with the $1 annual dues.
  • NNRC "High Frequencies" Column, 1942-1945 - Ever wonder what was on the shortwave bands in the 1940s? Here are copies of four NNRC "High Frequencies" shortwave sections from and 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945. Gustav Siegfried Eins-9545, Radio Saigon-11780, Radio Congo Belge-11720, Radio Centre Moscow-15750, VE9AI-9540, XGOY-11900 . . . sigh!
  • International Short Wave Radio News - Here is an early shortwave bulletin (1930), International Short Wave Radio News, from the International Short Wave Radio League, headquartered in Boston. This is Vol. 1, No. 1, and features some interesting items, including an article about shortwave on Java (now part of Indonesia, then called the Dutch East Indies); a list of time zones (including such interesting ones as Holland at GMT+20 minutes, Bolivia at GMT-4 hrs., 33 min., and Colombia at GMT-4 hrs. 57 mins.); a list of international broadcasters (shown with wavelength only, no frequencies); and some station addresses. And if you are interested in joining, you can send your dollar for one year's dues, along with the application shown, and see what happens.

LISTS, LOGS, GUIDES & COLUMNS

  • 1939 Crosley and RCA Station Lists - Equipment manufacturers sometimes included station lists with their products, or offered them separately. Here are two logs from 1939, one from RCA and one from Crosley. As can be seen, they are nearly identical in layout and general content, having been produced by a third party, W. E. Eilrich (see bottom of pg. 8). The lists contain some interesting entries, considering that World War II started in Europe in 1939. The RCA list shows Prague under "Bohemia," while the Crosley list eliminates all Prague references; the RCA list for Austria says "See Germany," while the Crosley list does not mention Austria as a separate state at all, but lists Vienna as a transmitter site in Germany. And the Crosley list eliminates all references to Poland.
  • 1935 Shortwave Map - Here is a map from August 1935, showing the shortwave broadcast stations of the world. The numbers in the black circles correspond to the numbered stations at the bottom of the map, which are listed alphabetically by city. The map apparently originated with the BBC publication World-Radio.
  • "Radio Log & World War Map" - Here is a very nice "Radio Log & World War Map," distributed by David Spencer, Ltd., an appliance dealer in Vancouver, B.C., and promoting General Electric Radiotron tubes. With the reminder to "Keep Tuned to the Empire," it contains info on the company's radio repair service, a time zone chart, tips on getting good reception, and a list of American and Canadian broadcast band stations. The best part is the map, which is 19x24" in the original. On the map borders are lists of the world's principal shortwave stations, set out in three ways: by call letters (left hand side), by frequency (right), and by city (bottom). If you zoom in you can read the labels that identify numerous events of the war up to the time the map was published, which appears to be mid-1941. Examples: "DeGaulle welcomed at Douala [Cameroon], Oct. 10 - 40," "Germans scuttle Graf Spee, Dec. 17 - 39," "Nazi Battleship Bismark sunk, May 27 - 41," "The Germans invade Poland, Sep. 1 -39," "British & Free French invade Syria, June 8 - 41," etc.
  • 1966 WRTH "Special 20th Anniversary Messages" - The year 1966 was the World Radio TV Handbook's 20th anniversary. The 1966 Handbook contained a couple of pages of congratulatory messages, but WRTH also published a separate pamphlet, "Special 20th Anniversary Messages," containing many more messages. Shawn Axelrod of Winnipeg, Manitoba has kindly sent us a scan of the pamphlet, which we have posted here. Along with many messages from the world of international broadcasting, there are some familiar names among the DXers and club execs who wrote in: Arthur Cushen, Richard Ginbey, Victor Jaar, Barrie Wildblood, Don Jensen, August Balbi, Bill Eddings, Richard Wood.
  • Manufacturers Life Insurance Company DX map - Here is a 1940 DX map produced by the Manufacturers Life Insurance Company. What makes this otherwise ordinary world map interesting to DXers is the table of "Principal Short-Wave Stations of the World" shown in the lower right-hand corner and containing call letters, frequencies and map coordinates for many stations. The exact origins of this map are unknown, but it may have had something to do with GE station W2XAD, which seems to have been set apart for special treatment just to the left of the table. If you look closely at the map you will see indications of things, usually products, associated with various countries, e.g. "Wool. Tallow. Sealskins" for the Falklands, "Dates. Feathers" under Libya, "Coffee. Sugar" in Venezuela, and our favorite, above Kirgiz Kazaks, B14, "Caravan Traffic by Camels."
  • The RCA-Cunningham-Radiotron "World Wide Radio Tours" Map - What DXer doesn't like maps? Here is one from 1934 called the RCA-Cunningham-Radiotron "World Wide Radio Tours" map. On one side it has a world map showing the call letters of many of the principal shortwave stations of the world, together with frequency references along the left and right hand borders and other useful info about time, power, and frequency bands at the bottom. Zoom in for detail. On the other side is a map of the United States with the call letters of numerous broadcast band stations, plus a frequency index and a writeup about a "yardstick" to gauge the performance of your receiver. There are also some "Tips on Radio Touring," and, of course, ads for RCA Radiotron tubes.
  • "Radio Map of Europe" - Here is a very nice map from a 1933 publication called "IDEAS." The map covers a longwave and mediumwave frequency realignment plan that was to take effect in January 1934. The plan is explained in the text at the top of the map, with station-by-station detail shown in the columns on the left and right side of the map. Zoom in to read the fine print.
  • "The Radio Listener" - We had not run across the name of Edward Ayvazian of West Newton, Massachusetts, in connection with DX until we saw his 1938 publication, "The Radio Listener," which we have posted in PDF form here. Although he invited readers to send in various kinds of other info for this "magazine," "The Radio Listener" was basically a list, covering foreign LW and MW stations, plus SWBC. This is the first issue, dated September 1, 1938. It was planned as a quarterly, and there were December 1938 and March 1939 issues, both reflecting the same format as the first. How long "The Radio Listener" lasted beyond that is not known. But this mimeo publication looks like a pretty credible list, and includes for some entries not just station name and location but also address, QSL policy, interval signal, operating schedule, etc. There was an Edward J. Ayvazian , West Newton, Mass. who was a senior at Newton High School in 1939.
  • "Broadcasting Stations of the World" - Thanks to Tetsuya Hirahara of Japan, who has brought to our attention a University of Illinois link http://hdl.handle.net/10111/UIUCOCA:Serial/broadcastingstat where full copies of various issues of "Broadcasting Stations of the World" from 1953 to 1974 are posted in several formats. BSW was published by the U.S.Foreign Broadcast Information Service ("FBIS," earlier the Foreign Broadcast Monitoring Service and the Foreign Broadcast Intelligence Service) most years until 1974. Although the "View holdings" info accessed via the link at the top of the Univ. of Illinois page says the first issue was published in 1946, we have an earlier one, dated August 1, 1945, which we have posted in its entirety (66 pages). We have also posted a database file containing all the data from this edition of BSW, sortable in different ways. It is compiled in Microsoft Access (free readers are available on line, or, with some limitations, you can read Access files in Excel.) Asterisk = inactive.
  • Quixote Radio Club "Station Data" - When shortwave broadcasting started to gain a following in the early 1930s, numerous "logs" and "lists" began appearing. They were typically arranged by frequency. It wasn't until the World Radio Handbook appeared in 1947 that comprehensive information on a by-country basis became widely available. An early step in that direction, however, was the by-country compilations of the Quixote Radio Club. These gathered together in one place the basic data that was available on each country's shortwave operations. The listiings were too long for any one issue of the club's bulletin, the "Short Wave Reporter," so they were spread over several issues. Here is the full alphabetical compilation that was published during the months of October, November and December 1937.
  • Clandestine Broadcasting - It was the 1970s when clandestine stations became prime targets for DX listening. Over the years within the DX community there had been some material published on clandestine stations, usually about particular stations or about clandestine broadcasting generally during World War II and after. Comprehensive and timely information on which to base DXing was still scarce, however, until 1971, when two valuable items were published. One was "Clandestines--The Political Voice of Radio," an article by Bill Matthews which appeared in the 1971 issue of the WRTH annual, How to Listen to the World. It presented a survey of clandestine broadcasting activities past and present. The other was Larry Magne's "Broadcasting Stations of Exile, Intelligence, Liberation and Revolutionary Organizations," which presented information on all the then-current clandestines in a WRTH-style format. Thanks to Bill Matthews, Larry Magne and WRTH for permission to share this material here.
  • 1953 Universal Radio DX Club Shortwave Log - Here is another Universal Radio DX Club shortwave station list, this one from 1953.
  • 1946 Universal Radio DX Club Station List - Shortwave station lists, together with loggings and feature articles in club bulletins and radio magazines, have long been prime sources of DX information. Some of these lists were commercial, while others were produced by clubs. Here is one of the most comprehensive lists, one prepared by the Universal Radio DX Club in 1946, the year before the World Radio Handbook started publication. Those bands looked mighty busy.
  • 1925 Station Lists - We are so used to going to the WRTH or the internet for basic shortwave station information that it is almost impossible to imagine a time when such information was not available. Before the WRTH, listeners had to rely mainly on shortwave station lists of varying detail which were published in magazines, or the occasional list put out by the Department of Commerce. What was the first list of non-amateur shortwave stations? It's hard to say for certain, but a strong candidate would be one that appeared in the August 1925 issue of QST and was reprinted in the August 2, 1925 issue of The New York Times. It had 48 entries (frequencies). Most were commercial or experimental stations, but some were directly related to shortwave broadcasting: KDKA and 8XS (the original KDKA shortwave call); GE station 2XI, predecessor to W2XAF (later WGEO); KFKX, the KDKA relay station in Hastings, Nebraska that rebroadcast KDKA's shortwave signal; and 1XAO in Belfast, Maine, an RCA station used to pick up 5XX longwave from England and relay it on shortwave to RCA New York, from which it was rebroadcast on the standard broadcast band. Keep in mind that at the time, KDKA and 2XI (plus perhaps a very experimental WLW shortwave simulcast, 8XAL) were the only shortwave broadcast stations on the air, anywhere. The Times list differed slightly from the QST list. Call letters were different in a few cases, and a couple of entries were omitted. The original QST list was found to contain a number of errors (there were some typos, it got some station locations mixed up, and it listed 1XAO as Belfast, Ireland instead of Belfast, Maine), and so a revised list was published in the September QST. For shortwave experimenters, this list was probably big news at the time. Here is a file containing the three lists--the QST original, the Times reprint, and the QST correction.
  • 1936 Philco Radio Log - Tons of "radio logs," containing station listings, were published during the 1920s, 30s and 40s. Here is the 1936 Philco Radio Log (prepared by the Haynes Radio Log), which contains the usual things--lists of stations, in this case standard broadcast, SWBC and police channels--plus a few other things: an offer of a year's worth of the bi-weekly Chicago Short Wave Radio Club bulletin, and 2-1/2 years worth of updates to the Philco Radio Log, both for $2; major league baseball dates; presidential electoral results for 1928 and 1932 and blanks for 1936; and (no surprise) a centerfold ad for "The New 1937 Philco with the built-in Philco Foreign Tuning System" (color-coded bandspread dial). The log's size is 4-1/4 x 6-1/2".
  • Radio Pictorial Listeners' Guide - Here is a March 1935 supplement to Radio Pictorial, a weekly British radio magazine. The inside of the supplement contains a map of the major mediumwave stations in the U.K. and continental Europe at the time. There is a list of locations and wavelengths on the back, and pictures of station personalities on the cover. This item is best viewed by setting your Adobe reader to one of the "side-by-side" viewing modes.
  • Hallicrafters International Short-Wave Station List - This 1952, eight-panel list contains some introductory information about SWLing, and showing, by country, the most often-heard shortwave stations of the day, together with their frequencies and the best times to listen. The last panel contains a world time chart and a table showing best reception times for the various bands.
  • 1967 Hammond Award World Atlas - This 1967 world atlas also contains some DXing information. On the inside front cover and first two pages is a station list captioned "24-Hour Short Wave Schedule." It is a list of English-language shortwave broadcasts audible in the U.S., including time and frequency, and is reprinted from Electronics Illustrated. At the end of the atlas is another shortwave list, titled "Marine Weather Broadcasts," with many 2 MHz. stations arranged under four geographic areas. This is followed by a two-page world time chart. The rest of the atlas (not shown) is a standard atlas.
  • "A Guide to Radio Listening" - This was issued by the Voice of America around 1986 in connection with the "Worldwide Shortwave Spectrum" program. The program started in 1984 as a segment of "VOA Magazine" and became the standalone "Communications World" in 1987. It was hosted by Gene Reich, who was eventually succeeded by the guide's author, Kim Andrew Elliott, then the VOA's Director of Audience Research. Kim advises, "I wrote it in the 1980s in response to the many letters (not much e-mail back then) to VOA asking for advice on improving reception (which was mainly on shortwave then)." The guide is a good introduction to shortwave--frequencies, propagation, receivers, antennas, QRM, DXing, etc. It was a nice example by VOA of both promotion of SW and assistance to SWLs.
  • RCA Victor World-Wide Radio - This pamphlet was published in 1934. RCA introduced its first all wave radios in 1933, just as "all wave" was becoming a consumer sensation. This pamphlet promoted shortwave and facilitated customers' use of their new receivers. It covers many of the basics of SWLing--time changes, propagation, the types of signals heard on shortwave, etc. It also contains a listing of the times and frequencies of many of the shortwave broadcast stations of the day. It closes (p. 11) with a brief promotion for "the Short-Wave Club" in Klondyke, Ohio (by which it means the International Short Wave Club), and for the Electrical Division, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, U.S. Department of Commerce, which in 1934 published the first "official" shortwave station list in the U.S., "World Short-Wave Radiophone Transmitters."
  • Philco All-Wave Radio Log, Special War-Time Edition - Here is a pamphlet from 1940-41 called the "Philco All-Wave Radio Log, Special War-Time Edition." It appears to be a joint production of Philco and something called the "Western World Wave Club" in Berkeley, California. Whether the club was an independent club or a Philco offshoot is unknown. In addition to information about broadcast band stations in the western U.S., the log contains an interesting shortwave list showing the quality of reception of many shortwave stations (very strong, good, fair, weak), hour by hour, in western parts of the United States. This log is the "Winter Edition, 1940-41," and while Philco published a variety of logs and lists in its day, this is the only edition of this particular title that we have seen.
  • Broadcasting Stations of the World - The year 1946 was the first year that England's "Wireless World" magazine published the booklet, "Broadcasting Stations of the World." It contained lists of shortwave stations arranged by frequency and by location, and like lists of European mediumwave stations. Here is that first edition. Perhaps to avoid confusion with the "Broadcasting Stations of the World" which the U.S. Foreign Broadcasting Intelligence Service had started publishing in 1945, the British publication changed its name to "Guide to Broadcasting Stations" in the second edition. Many subsequent editions were published, the last in 2001.
  • The Globe Trotter - RCA marketed numerous "Globe Trotter" receivers over many years. Here is a booklet, "The Globe Trotter," that was published in connection with RCA's Globe Trotter receiver of 1937. In addition to a list of the principal shortwave stations of the day (arranged by frequency and by country), a world map, and a list of American and Canadian broadcast band stations, the first few pages contain a good example of the kind of promotion that was embodied in shortwave advertising. "And to these fine radios have been added the adventure and thrill of short wave reception, enabling you to listen to the whole wide world--taking you to those places of which you have read--truly a magic carpet awaits you . . . ."
  • White's Mileage and Radio Call Book - Although White's Radio Log was not the first AM station log, it became the best known; and while it disappeared for a time in the 1950s and again in the 1980s, it also had the longest overall lifespan. Known under various names in its early days, the first issue was published in 1924, and the last in 1985. Here is a very early copy of White's, known as White's Mileage and Radio Call Book. This was probably not the first issue of White's; however, this one was published in 1924, which was White's first year of publication. It lists stations by call letters and states (but not by frequency, which came later). It was published in Rhode Island, and the New England flavor of this edition is evident by the mileage chart (p. 16) that is based on Boston, and the hours of operation (p. 18) "of the principal broadcasting stations commonly heard by Mass. radio fans."
  • Here is a copy of the list of "Best Short Wave Stations." It appeared in each issue of Official Short Wave Listener magazine, which was published in 1935-36. Shortwave station lists began appearing circa 1927, but for several years the absence of concrete information on foreign shortwave operations made the lists of limited use. For one thing, they seldom distinguished between commercial and broadcasting stations (in part because in those days many stations performed both functions). "Shortwave was shortwave." Also, little weeding of the lists took place, making some lists notoriously inaccurate. By the mid-1930s, published lists had become more useful. One of the best was the list published in Official Short Wave Listener. This one is from the February-March 1936 issue. There are some familiar frequencies there--the BBC on 11750, Australia on 9580.
  • Pittsburgh Press "Radio Broadcasting Stations" - A very early BCB "log," this one from the Pittsburgh Press, owner of station WCAE. The log must have been the property of R. B. Dakin, whose name is penned in at the top of the cover. The size is 3-1/2"W x 6-1/2"H. To put the date in perspective, KDKA came on the air in November 1920, and the "broadcasting boom" took off in 1922 after a slow start in 1921. This item is dated January 1, 1923, and is thus from the time when the boom was really booming. It is hard to believe that so many stations had come on the air in so short a time, although it is worth noting that stations came and went quickly and some licensees never made it on the air at all. What makes this item especially interesting is that it lists the owners of the stations. Everyone wanted to get into the radio act, it seems, from the American Legion in Lincoln, Nebraska (WGAT) to the Motor Service Station in Casper, Wyoming (KFCQ) to St. Patrick's Cathedral in El Paso, Texas (WPAT). Note the handwritten notes on the third to the last image.
  • The Silvertone World Wide Radio Log of 1934 - Silvertone was a Sears brand, and the Silvertone "logs" were published into at least the late 1940s, albeit in a smaller format in the latter years. This issue contains, in addition to the expected advertising for Silvertone receivers and other radio products, lists of U.S. BCB stations, a world time chart and a time zone map, "Ten Rules for Better Short Wave Reception," "How to identify Most popular Stations by Their Signatures," and "World's Shortwave Stations" and "Best Short Wave Stations" (by frequency).
  • "First Class World Tours via the Superb New RCA Victor Magic Brain Instruments" was published in 1936. In addition to promoting the RCA "Magic Brain" receivers and instructing readers on how to use them, it contained a basic introduction to shortwave broadcasting and shortwave reception, lists of worldwide shortwave stations, American broadcast stations on shortwave, and domestic AM stations, and a glossary of radio terms and "Magic Brain" key words. The pamphlet also describes the RCA "Magic Eye" tuning eye. Some RCA radios of the day featured a "Magic Voice" speaker, and RCA also sold a "Magic Brain" record player. Be sure to check your tubes (back cover)!
  • The "On the Short Waves" book and website are named after a column that appeared in Radio News from July 1928 to June 1929 and that was one of the first columns in any popular American magazine that was devoted exclusively to short wave broadcasting. Here are two "On the Short Waves" columns from the February and March 1929 issues of the magazine. The type is a little small, but careful reading of these columns will give a good feel for the status of SWBC SWLing at the time.
  • Scott Allwave Short Wave Station Schedule - Here is another E. H. Scott item, a brochure called the "Scott Allwave Short Wave Station Schedule." This is a 1934 item containing news of the BBC, France, Germany, Spain, and Australia, a chart covering the transmissions of U.S. and foreign shortwave stations, and instructions on "How To Tune On Short Waves With Scott Allwave Fifteen."
  • "Globe Girdling" - One of the most popular DX magazines of the 1930s was "All Wave Radio." Here is its shortwave editor, J. B. L. Hinds of Yonkers, New York, with the January 1936 edition of his column, "Globe Girdling."
  • 1939 Scott Foreign and U.S. Short Wave Tuning Guide - Here is another E. H. Scott item. After you bought your Scott receiver, you could use this booklet to tell you how to tune and what stations to listen for. It features an introductory section, "How to Get Results On Short Waves," along with schedules of U.S. shortwave stations, a very nice list of stations worldwide, a world time chart, great circle map of the world centered on New York, and a list of U.S. BCB stations.
  • J. B. L. Hinds "Picks the Ten Best" - What would be your vote for the "Ten Best Foreign Short Wave Stations"? Here are the picks of editor J. B. L. Hinds in his first article for the shortwave section ofShort Wave Radio magazine, July 1934.
  • "These You Can Hear" - This was the name of a 1947 publication by the Amalgamated Short Wave Press of London, reprinting a series of station profiles that had appeared in the British monthly, "Short Wave News." SWN was oriented mainly toward hams, but it contained some excellent shortwave broadcast information as well. This 32-page pamphlet features writeups and photos on PCJ, Radio Brazzaville, Radio Canada, Radio Clube de Mozambique, HCJB, Voice of Guiana, Radio Australia, and the Rugby, England PTP station, plus tips for listening.
  • Marconi World Radio Atlas - This atlas appears to have been issued in the late 1930s. It contains information about the Canadian Marconi Company factory, shortwave--the "thrill band" of radio, propagation, how to tune, and how to obtain QSLs. This is followed by a list of shortwave stations of the world, "Empire" transmissions from Daventry, and a list of North American BCB stations.
  • The 1961 "Hallicrafters Guide to Short Wave Listening" - Just what possessed Hallicrafters to publish this pamphlet in a 2" wide x 3" long format I don't know, but here it is, with all you needed to know to get started, including information about receivers and a list of stations to try for. Promised its author: "Only by short wave radio can you become a witness to history as it occurs. And only through short wave can you hear, in a single day, a Wagnerian opera from Heidelburg . . . a news broadcast from behind the iron curtain . . . and an airport control tower bringing in a crippled plane. Every moment of every day and night, Short Wave brings into your home an absorbing new interest--a fascinating way to keep up with international affirs, to be informed and stay informed."
  • "Simplified World-Wide Radio Log," advised that "Mystery, Romance, Adventure and Thrills Aplenty to Be Found in New Greater Field Opened Up by Short Wave Radio." This 16-page pamphlet from 1934 contained just about all you needed to get started: an explanation of propagation, descriptions of stations (there is Eddie Startz on p. 7), logs of shortwave broadcast, BCB and utility stations, and, on the back cover, an ad for some Stewart-Warner "Round-the-World Radios."
  • The Philips Daily Shortwave Guide - From the U.K., the "Philips Daily Shortwave Guide, arranged by the hour" contains no date but appears to be from the 1930s. The U.S. stations exchanged their "X" calls for four-letter calls in 1939, and this booklet still reflects the former. Note the reference to "Br. India," and the use of wavelength rather than frequency.
  • Dial of the World - "Thrills, entertainment, education are at the command of the D-X fan . . ." says Stewart-Warner in a nice 16-page promotional booklet. There are instructions on how to tune (the lesson seems to be to "Tune Slowly"), photos of world events and some well-known stations, and a list of shortwave, longwave, mediumwave and police stations. The back cover contains advertising for their Ferrodyne Round-the-World shortwave radios. This booklet contains no dates, but it appears to be from the mid-1930s.
  • WRTH Brochures - Here are some advertising brochures for the World Radio TV Handbook from the years 1967, 1974, 1976, 1977 and 1978. (Tnx to Michael Schmitz in Germany for the 1967 brochure.)
  • Band Survey - Here is a band survey from the February 1957 NNRC Bulletin, listing all Caribbean, Central American and South American stations reported to be operating between 3 and 8 MHz. The list shows frequency, call letters and station name and location. On the right there are two columns showing the approximate times, morning and evening (EST), when the stations were heard. Keep in mind that this is not a survey of all stations heard in these bands--just those from the Americas. Read and weep.
  • Kohler & Campbell Radio Log - In the 1920s, and even later, medium wave "radio logs," with lists of stations and places to enter dial readings were issued as promotional items by many different kinds of organizations--schools, markets, shoe companies, insurance firms, and, as this week's colorful item attests, piano companies, in this case Kohler & Campbell of Littleton, New Hampshire. This is from 1927. Note that station channels are shown only in meters, not kilocycles, and the original owner has enteerd a couple of dial readings from long ago.
  • Radio Wheels - photos of several radio "wheels" that were used as aids in tuning. Included are wheels from Hallicrafters, Lines & Fitzpatrick, and Crosley.
  • German Station Lists - Wolfgang Bueschel in Germany sends along two pictures of station lists taken by Bernhard Weiskopf, Mannheim, Germany at an exhibition of pre-World war II radio sets held by Prof. Soll in Neu-Isenburg, near Frankfurt am Main. These LW and MW listings are from around the 1941-1944 era. Note that the Podebrad site in occupied Czechoslavakia is listed, along with various stations that are still on the air, e.g. Warsaw 224 (now 225), Luxembourg 232 (now 234), Stuttgart Muehlacker 574 (now 576), Vienna Bisamberg 592 (now ITU registered 585), Prague 638, Leipzig Wiederau 785 (now 783), and Warsaw 1384 (now Kaliningrad Bolshakovo [soon Sitkunai, Lithuania] 1386).
  • Radio Design (Spring 1930) - Another review of SW logs from the Pilot Radio & Tube Corp. house organ, Radio Design, this time the Spring 1930 isue. Actually, the heart of these logs is a reprint of part of the February 10, 1930 issue of the bulletin of the International Short Wave Club of Klondyke, Ohio. There is an introductory feature about the club, including a photo of the club's founder, Arthur J. Green. For the definitive history of the ISWC, see George Zeller's article, "The Founding of the International Short Wave Club in Klondyke, Ohio."
  • Radio Design (1929) - A 1929 article about the shortwave broadcasting stations of the world, their times and frequencies. It also included a world time chart. This is the first of several such articles that appeared in the magazine Radio Design, the house organ of the Pilot Radio and Tube Corp., Brooklyn manufacturer of the "Wasp" series of shortwave receivers. We will present more from Radio Design in the future.

QSLS & OTHER STATION MEMORABILIA

  • Edgewater Beach Hotel, Chicago - The Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chicago should ring a bell with students of the early American broadcast band scene, for it was the first home of Zenith station WJAZ, which had developed out of the famous Chicago Radio Laboratory ("Mathews and Hassel") amateur station 9ZN in 1922. It was for promotional purposes that the hotel offered a home to WJAZ, which operated initially on the common broadcast band channel of 360 meters, moving to 448 meters (670 kc.) in 1923. The station left the hotel after a year, changed its call letters to WGN and sold WJAZ to the hotel, which changed the call letters to WEBH. (WJAZ lived on in other incarnations.) The story is memorialized in two QSLs that we have posted in "The CPRV Gallery." One, from WJAZ, verifies reception reported in a letter to the station dated May 16, 1923 (the day after the move to 670 kc.). Of perhaps greater interest is a brochure about the station, and the hotel, which we have posted with the QSL. It gives the wavelength as 448 meters, so it dates from the same period as the letter. The other QSL is a great-looking folder (with EKKO stamp) from WEBH, together with a nicely-illustrated promotional brochure from the station. WEBH, which called itself the Voice of the Great Lakes, was on the air from the hotel for about four years. Newspapers played a big role in both stations, the Chicago Tribune at WJAZ, the Chicago Evening Post at WEBH. The hotel closed in 1967 and was demolished in 1970-71.
  • SWLing Certificates - Here are some more SWLing certificates. From days past, we have posted, from 1959, a listeners' competition award from Radio Sofia; an undated Lifetime Membership Certifiicate issued by the World Wide DX League, a project of DXing Horizons magazine (1960-61); from 1963, a Canadian BCB Award sponsored by the Canadian DX Club and various Canadian stations; from 1971, the NASWA Worldwide DXer Award; and from 1976, the "Broadcast" Ladder Competition Award issued by the New Zealand Radio DX League. And lest you think there are no certificates still available, John Fisher of North Chelmsford, Massachusetts has sent us three recent additions to his collection: a Radio Romania International Listeners' Club Membership certificate (2015); an AWR "Wavescan" competition certificate (2017); and a NASWA "Final Countdown" Contest certificate (2017).
  • W9XA - Here is a file containing an interesting QSL from W9XA, one of the early "apex" band stations that operated in the 25-27 MHz. area (some higher) during the late 1930s. It is a newsletter, "The Radio Engineer," published by the Commercial Radio Equipment Co. of Kansas City, Missouri, owner of the station. The QSL was sent to ace BCB DXer Kermit Geary, and the QSL statement is on the last page. The newsletter contains much interesting information about the station, and about the local and long-distance properties of the apex band, which were just being learned. Most of the apex stations simulcasted their owners' broadcast band channels, and while W9XA rebroadcast programs from several stations, it also had its own studios. One of the stations it rebroadcast was KITE, and a QSL from that station, sent to Roger Legge, appears in the file following the newsletter. The apex band was closed in 1941, and the stations either went to then-new FM, or left the band.
  • Station Questionnaires & Reception Reporting Log Forms - If you were DXing in the 1960s and 1970s, and even later, you remember getting questionnaires from international shortwave broadcasters. They were pretty rudimentary--what programs do you like, when do you hear us best, what equipment do you use, etc. Such station questionnaires have a long history. Here are three examples: a questionnaire and monthly reception reporting log form from NHK, Tokyo, Japan, distributed in the 1930s; a questionnaire from "Zeesen," the German shortwave station, sent out in 1935; and a letter and questionnaire from MTCY, the Voice of Manchukuo, in Japanese-controlled Manchuria, 1940.
  • Byrd Expedition-III - We conclude our presentation of mementoes from the Second Byrd Antarctic Expedition of the mid-1930s with: (1) a two-page "Radio's Greatest Thrill" schedule of the Byrd broadcasts over CBS network stations (notice the inclusion of shortwavers W2XE and W3XAU); (2) a bookmark-style "thanks for your interest" message from General Foods that accompanied an etching of Admiral Byrd (does anyone have the etching?); (3) a pamphlet about the Curtiss-Wright Condor biplane used by the expedition (including instructions on how to obtain a kit to build a model); and (4) a postal cover with the "Byrd Antarctic Expedition II" postage stamp and an expedition-related cachet.
  • Byrd Expedition-II - On page 2 of the South Pole Radio News, which we posted below, there is an offer for a large map of the Second Byrd Antarctic Expedition, free for the asking with two Grape-Nuts box tops. Here is that good-looking map, together with accompanying cover letter and the mailing envelope. Zoom in for the detail.
  • Byrd Expedition-I - The big shortwave news of the mid-1930s was the second Byrd Antarctic Expedition. The first Antarctic Expedition, in 1928-1930, which saw Commander Richard E. Byrd make the first overflight of the South Pole, was equipped with code equipment but no voice capability. It was different for the 1933-1935 trip. Byrd made regular program transmissions, which were picked up in Argentina, relayed to RCA's "Radio Central" in Rocky Point, Long Island, and from there sent out by CBS over its national broadcasting network with much fanfare. The broadcasts were sponsored by Grape-Nuts, a General Foods product, and the company offered its listeners various mementoes of the event. One was the South Pole Radio News, a promotional newspaper containing much interesting information about the expedition, with a focus on the radio side of things. Here are two copies of South Pole Radio News, Vol. 1, No. 2 and Vol. 1, No. 3. (Has anyone ever seen Vol. 1, No. 1?)
  • The June 1934 issue of Short Wave Radio magazine contained an article about a one-hour program that had been broadcast over G.E. stations W2XAF and W2XAD, Schenectady, New York, at 1800 EST on Friday, March 16, 1934, for world-wide reception at that hour. It was an attempt to reach all countries at the same time without relays, and the program was hosted by "Believe It or Not" originator Robert Ripley. Listeners were invited to send in reception reports. Said the article: "Ripley drew a special cartoon as a souvenir for this broadcast and to all persons outside of the United States who write General Electric that they heard this program a copy of this will be mailed." Question: Has anyone ever seen this cartoon?
  • Station Certificates - Here is another group of cards/certificates that were issued by stations, some in connection with station "clubs," others as awards for stations verified or as displays for station verification stamps. Specifically they are: (1-4), several Radio Prague monitoring certificates and a Radio Prague Monitor Club membership card; (5 & 6) two Radio Sofia diplomas (1978 and 1991); (7) a Radio Havana Cuba DX Club certificate, issued for ten reports (1990); (8) an Adventist World Radio QSL Certificate with the early version of AWR verification stamps (1970s); (9) an AWR Wavescan DX Contest certificate with the later version of the AWR verification stamps (certificate originally issued in 1996 and "repurposed" for use in 2004); (10) a page of the later AWR verification stamps covering many locations; (11) a Trans World Radio "verified all sites" certificate (1989); and (12) an HCJB-issued certificate for verifying "World By 2000" participating stations.
  • EAQ, Spain - In shortwave broadcasting's earlier days, clubs liked to arrange special broadcasts from stations, which were often very accommodating. Here is one such broadcast, made in April 1936 over station EAQ in Spain on behalf of the London Chapter of the International Shortwave Club, then headquartered in East Liverpool, Ohio (it moved to England after the war). We have posted a file containing the announcement of the broadcast in the ISWC's monthly bulletin, International Short Wave Radio; the QSL sent out by the club's European representative, Arthur E. Bear (who would head up the club after the war); and, from the May 1936 ISWC bulletin, a photo of the attendees of the London Chapter's third annual dinner-dance which was held in March of that year.
  • Radio for Free Asia Commemorative Medal
  • Station-Designed Stamps & Seals Pt. 4 - Here is the final file of station-designed stamps and seals. The previous three files (below) have been from American broadcast stations. The stamps in this file are from stations other than American broadcast band stations. They are: CHNS-CHNX, Halifax, Nova Scotia; CKAC, Montreal, Quebec; CKCL, Toronto, Ontario; CMBC, Havana, Cuba; IBRA Radio; Radio Ecclesia, Luanda, Angola (not a postage stamp, possibly a fund-raising stamp); Radio Free Russia (a clandestine that was heard in 1954 and many years thereafter); Radio of Free Asia (a Korea-based organization); the Voice of Prophecy; and Spatari, the "international radio language" c. 1938-39.
  • Station-Designed Stamps & Seals Pt. 3 - Here is another file with station-designed stamps and seals from American broadcast band stations. In this file are: WGBI, Scranton, PA; WGHB, Clearwater, FL; Master Kraft Oil Burner Radio Programs (NBC stations WGY-WJZ-WBZ-WBZA); WHAS, Louisville, KY (one of a five-stamp series of identical stamps but in different colors and bearing the numbers 1 through 5); WJAX, Jacksonviille, FL; WLAC, Nashville, TN; WMCA, New York, NY; the Ave Maria Radio Hour, Graymoor, NY (WMCA, New York, NY, and WIP, Philadelphia, PA); WOO, Philadelphia, PA (Wanamaker's); WREC, Memphis, TN; WSAN, Allentown, PA; WSB, Atlanta, GA; WSM, Nashville, TN; and WTIC, Hartford, CT.
  • Monitoring Times QSL Articles - Several illustrated articles about QSLs have appeared recently in Monitoring Times. The October 2011 issue contained an article titled "Looking at QSLs and Seeing History" which discusses QSLs and political history. The second article, from the December 2011 issue, is titled "QSLs Give Life to Radio History," and it addresses QSLs and radio history.
  • Station-Designed Stamps & Seals Pt. 2 - Here is another file with station-designed stamps and seals used by American broadcast band stations for verification and other promotional purposes. In this file are: KMOX, St. Louis, MO; KOA, Denver, CO (foil seal); KRKD, Los Angeles, CA; KSCJ, Sioux City, IA; KSL, Salt Lake City, UT; KWK, St. Louis, MO; WBAL, Baltimore, MD; WCAL, Northfield, MN; WCBA, Allentown, PA; WCFL, Chicago, IL; and WCOD, Harrisburg, PA.
  • Station-Designed Stamps & Seals Pt. 1 - While EKKO stamps were the principal stamps that stations used during the verification stamp era, many stations designed their own stamps or seals for verification or other purposes. We have pooled our resources and posted a file containing a number of these stamps from American broadcast band stations. They are: KDKA, Pittsburgh, PA (25th Anniversary); KDKA (New Transmitter, 1939); KFDM, Beaumont, TX; KFI, Los Angeles, CA; KFQU, Holy City, CA; KFSD, San Diego, CA; KFWI, San Francisco, CA; KFWM, Oakland, CA; KFYR, Bismarck, ND; KGEZ, Kalispell, MT; KGO, Oakland, CA (a foil seal); and KGO again (a stamp).
  • Bryant Stamps - EKKO stamps--the verification stamps that were popular in the 1920s--are quite well known, Bryant stamps less so. Bryant stamps were somewhat of a competitor to EKKO stamps. However, we have seen many thousands of old BCB QSLs and, unlike EKKO's, we have never seen one bearing a Bryant stamp. Presumably you bought them direct from the company (P. M. Bryant, Chicago). Here is a file containing some sample pages from a 1925 Bryant stamp album. It is set up much the same as an EKKO album--pages for the stamps (which were a little less artful than the EKKO's), then lists of American broadcast band stations arranged by call letters and location, followed by pages for keeping a log of stations heard. Also shown are several sheets of unperforated Bryant stamps. A little research shows that the stations are arranged on the sheets alphabetically by state (left-to-right, top-to-bottom), though not necessarily alphabetically by call letters within the state. Could you send a list of stations to Bryant and have them send you a sheet of stamps for the requested call letters? Did you have to send the QSLs? There is some suggestion on line that you could buy the album with a complete set of stamps. Unlike EKKO's, which bore the words "Verified Reception Stamp," Bryant stamps carried no indication that they were meant to signify verification of reception.
  • Who doesn't have fond memories of the Radio Netherlands Happy Station program? Here are four Happy Station calendars. These are from 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1989. The 1969 calendar contains some great old photos of Happy Station host Eddy Startz, "and friends." The 1989 calendar is a montage of various Happy Station graphics, and is best viewed by setting your Adobe Reader to "four panel square" mode.
  • "PCJ," Radio Nederland - Here are six pages of info that you might have received in the mail from "PCJ," Radio Nederland, in 1948, specifically the station's summer schedule and the schedule of Eddie Startz's "Happy Station" program.
  • Christmas and New Years - Here are a number of Christmas and New Years radio-related cards of the past. Included are: TI4NRH, Heredia, Costa Rica; OTC, Leopoldville, Belgian Congo; Radio France Asie, Saigon, Vietnam (1955); two cards from Commander E. F. McDonald, Jr. of Zenith Radio Corp. (1942 and 1957); and two Christmas cards (Card 1, Card 2) which appear to date from the very early days of radio.
  • Radio New York Worldwide traces its history to W1XAL, which came on the air in 1931 (and itself traces its history to W2XAL, which started broadcasting in 1927). W1XAL became WRUL in 1939, and - with the same call letters - Radio New York Worldwide in 1962. It adopted the call letters WNYW in 1966. This program schedule is from May-October 1964, and illustrates one of the best modern-day examples of American private shortwave broadcasting. It points out the station's coverage of the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York; the station's political, olympic and Wall Street coverage; a special Peace Corps program; the Indianapolis 500; and more. There is a brief history of the station on p. 6, and on p. 7 news from listeners (including a promotion for the ASWLC, which had been formed in 1959). Radio New York Worldwide's affiliation with ABC gave the station access to a professional news team, whose members are shown on the last page.
  • WMAF, South Dartmouth, Massachusetts - One of the more colorful characters in early American broadcasting was Col. Edward Howland Robinson Green, a bigger-than-life resident of the majestic Round Hill estate, most of whose land is now part of the town of South Dartmouth, Massachusetts. Green's broadcast band station, WMAF, came on the air in 1922 with 100 watts (later increased). Here are two interesting items from WMAF. One is a Round Hill "poster stamp" (a non-postage stamp) reflecting the station's call letters, plus some other sites at Round Hill. The other is a reception report sent to WMAF from England in 1923, which makes for interesting reading. The report is from a fascinating book, "Colonel Edward Howland Robinson Green and the World He Created at Round Hill" by Barbara Fortin Bedell. The book is available from http://www.partnersvillagestore.com/ in Westport, Mass., or directly from Ms. Bedell at bb280z@yahoo.com. (The report is reproduced here with Ms. Bedell's permission.) The origin of the poster stamp is unknown; notwithstanding her considerable knowledge of the Round Hill story, Ms. Bedell was unfamiliar with the stamp.
  • Let's Hear It for Applause Cards.
  • Two QSLs from Art Collins, founder of Collins Radio, Cedar Rapids, Iowa - by Bill Smith.
  • Certificates - Here are some of the certificates of achievement that many DXers have enjoyed collecting. From clubs past and present, they are: Boys' Life Radio Club "DXer" award (QSLing all continents), 1958; International Radio Club of America (IRCA), 2,800 BCB stations verified, 1973; International Shortwave Club (ISWC) "Heard All Continents" award; International Short Wave League (ISWL) (U.K.) "Century Award" (100 countries), 1958; NNRC "Certificate of Achievement" award, 30 zones verified, 1971; NNRC "Certificate of DX Qualification," 400 BCB stations verified, 1947 (updated to 1,000 in 1952); NNRC "Certificate of Merit" award, 100 BCB stations verified, 1946 (with stickers, including one for 1,100 stations, 1951); NNRC "Super Ace" certificate, 500 BCB stations QSLed, 1947; NNRC "Short Wave Explorer," 1958; National Radio Club (NRC) "Medium Wave DXer Award," 51 countries verified, 1965; NRC "DX Award" certificates for verifying eight Canadian provinces (1980) and 2,876 BCB stations (1977); SPEEDX "African Listener" certificate with stickers for 15, 25, 50, 75 and 100 stations heard (1989); and a Universal Radio DX Club "Countries Heard Certificate" for 182 countries. These certificates are from the collections of Eugene S. Allen, William F. Flynn, John C. Herkimer, Roger Legge, Robert S. Knox, and Jerry Berg.
  • More Certificates - More certificates, this time membership certificates from ACE (1983), ADXR (1983), ASWLC (1967 and 1970), the Australian DX Radio Club (1946), the British Short Wave League (1945), the International Round Table (1946), the Great Circle Shortwave Society (1987), the International Short Wave Club (1940), the International Short Wave League (1946 and 1956), the International DXers Allliance (IDA, 1935), and a charter establishing the Minnesota chapter of the IDA (1939). These originated with Bill Flynn, Roger Legge, Larry Lundberg, Sid Steele, and Jerry Berg.
  • And More Certificates - Here is another group of membership cards and certificates. They are from NASWA (c. 1967), NNRC (1950s), New Zealand DX Club (1945), New Zealand DX Radio Assn. (1956), New Zealand Radio DX League (1960), Quixote Radio Club (1939), Union of Asian DXers (1980), Universal Radio DX Club (membership cards from the 1950s, and an "Official DX Listening Post" certificate), Victory Radio Club, and the VK-NZ SWL Card Exchange & Friendship Club (1939). These items are from the collections of Bill Flynn, Larry Lundberg, Roger Legge, and Jerry Berg.
  • And More Certificates - These originated with various magazines, and belonged to William F. Flynn, Richard E. Davis, Eugene S. Allen, Roger Legge, Jr., and Larry Lundberg, all of whom have gone on to that great DXpedition in the sky. The certificates are: (1) Two "official radio broadcast monitor" cards from Popular Electronics (1957 & 1960). Hank Bennett used to send these to contributors to his PE column. (2) One of many certificates of achievement offered by the Electronics Illustrated DX Club, which operated from 1961 into the 1970s. This one was issued in 1967 and was for 100 countries heard. The "club" existed solely for the purpose of issuing awards, and by 1965 over 2,000 had qualified and had their names listed in the magazine. The "club" had its own countries list, and a monthly column of loggings and news called "Notes from EI's DX Club." (3) An "Official Certificate of Verified International Reception," issued by Radio Digest magazine for the international medium wave tests which took place during International Radio Week, January 24-30, 1926. During the several such tests which took place during 1923-26, many U.S. and European stations stayed off the air at designated hours in order to give DXers on both sides of the ocean a better chance at long-distance reception. (4) An "Official DX Listening Post Certificate" issued in 1938 to contributors of Radio News. (5) A similar certificate issued in 1952 by Ken Boord to supporters of his Radio & Television News column. (6) A card issued to subscribers of the DX magazine, Radio Index (RADEX), circa the mid-1930s. (7) A charter establishing the "Minnesota Golden Gophers" chapter of the Radio Signal Survey League. It is undated, but the RSSL was a project of All-Wave Radio during the years 1937-38. And (8) a certificate issued by the RSSL in 1938 for verifying all continents. Note the foil seal in the lower right, and the crossing out of the "All-Wave Radio" designation. This certificate is from October 1938, two months after All-Wave Radio had been taken over by Radio News.
  • And Even More Certificates - This time we have some cards and certificates issued by shortwave station "clubs" et al. These include: (1) & (2) two BBC World Radio Club membership cards (Hobart Beal and Ernie Behr); (3) a BBC World Service Reception Survey card (Russ Mappin, 1972); (4) a BBC World Service World Radio Club DX Award (Bill Flynn, 1970); (5) Radio Budapest Shortwave Club Worldwide membership certificate (Larry Lundberg, 1970); (6) Radio Bulgaria Monitor Club membership certificate (Ian Wilson, 2000); (7) Radio Canada Shortwave Club (Harold Sellers, 1969); (8) Radio Kiev DX Club (John Herkimer, 1979); (9) Radio New York Worldwide Listeners Club membership certificate (Bill Flynn, 1970); (10) Radio Prague Monitor Club membership certificate (Harold Sellers, 1969); (11) & (12) Radio RSA Monioring Panel membership certificates (David Walcutt, 1979 & 1983); and (13) & (14).
  • Pennants - Here is a photo from Henrik Klemetz of a "pennant wall" from his shack in the early 70s in Sweden.
  • DX Jewelry - For the listener who does not like to be too far from reminders of the hobby, some DX jewelry, specifically three pins. One is from station OTC, Belgian Congo. (Also shown is an OTC QSL.) The second is a pin from HCJB. It was issued in 1956 in commemoration of 25 years of broadcasting. (The card to which it was attached is shown as well.) The third is from Radio Nederland, issued at a time, and for purposes, unknown.
  • EKKO Stamps - Here is a 1924 EKKO stamp album. Open the cover and you find a map followed by the frontispiece and then 70 pages of EKKO stamp pages. These are followed by an alphabetical list of stations where you could enter your dial settings, then a list of stations by wavelength and a log for entering stations heard. Finally, there is a letter from The EKKO Company explaining and promoting the virtues of EKKO stamps.
  • Voice of America Medal.
  • A vintage postcard from Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, with the handwritten warning in Spanish, "Science is truth, but don't trust in the wireless."
  • The new AWR QSL designed by Dr. Adrian Peterson shows radio stamps issued by AWR over the years.
  • An "Applause Card" from Uruguay dated 1926, from Horacio Nigro, Uruguay.
  • Applause Gram - A telegram version of the 1920s "Applause Card" - from George Zeller, Cleveland, Ohio.

EQUIPMENT & ADVERTISING

  • S. S. Kresge - You may be old enough to remember S. S. Kresge's, but you probably weren't around when they had a radio department that sold tubes, batteries, parts, speakers, and the Pilot "Super-Wasp" receiver in kit form. Here is their 1929 radio catalog.
  • I. J. Cooper - I. J. Cooper of Cincinnati was one of Powell Crosley's two partners (brother Lewis Crosley was the other) when they formed the American Automotive Accessories Co. in 1916. Cooper followed with the I. J. Cooper Rubber Co., and branched out from tires and accessories to the radio distributor business. We have posted an original photo of Cooper at the dials of a Grebe CR-18 receiver, together with a clipping from the May 22, 1927 edition of the Newport News (Virginia) Daily Press, one of several papers where the photo appeared. We have also posted a file containing two I. J. Cooper Rubber Co./Grebe advertisements, the first from the Indianapolis Star (December 18, 1927), the second from The (Nashville) Tennessean (November 20, 1927). Zoom in to see the details. The CR-18 was one of just a few "consumer grade" shortwave receivers of the day.
  • "The Finest Hours" - Here is a file containing several shortwave receiver photos from the movie, "The Finest Hours."
  • "Submarine Alert" - For those who like to keep an eye out for shortwave radios in the movies, here is a lobby card for an oldie entitled "Submarine Alert," a 1943 film starring Richard Arlen and Wendy Barrie. From Netflix: "When FBI radio engineer Lee Deerhold (Richard Arlen) is fired from his job, he's unaware that his termination is part of a larger plot by the feds to have him unwittingly infiltrate a gang of Nazi saboteurs who've developed a powerful new transmitter. By the time he learns that he's been used by both the FBI and the Nazis, Deerhold may be in too deep to escape. Wendy Barrie and Nils Asther co-star in this tale of World War II-era paranoia." That looks like a Hallicrafters S-9 or SX-9 Super Skyrider, c. 1936, a little old for World War II work. Apparently both Arlen and Der Bingle knew something about shortwave, as shown by the story, "Radio Stars are DX Rivals," from the October 1934 issue of RADEX, reproduced with the lobby card.
  • "World Wide Short Wave Reception" - James Millen went to work for the National Company in Malden, Massachusetts in the mid-1920s. He became the father of the highly-regarded National line of recevers. Here is a monograph, "World Wide Short Wave Reception," written by Millen in 1932, wherein he introduced shortwaves and shortwave broadcasting, described in detail two new National receivers (the latest progeny of the "Thrill Box" line), supplied a list of stations to try for (courtesy of the International Short Wave Club), and promoted National products. Millen was with the company until 1939, when he left to start the James Millen Manufacturing Corp. National remained in the radio receiver business for many years. For more on the man, and National, visit the website of the James Millen Society at http://www.isquare.com/millen/millen-page.htm.
  • The Pilot Radio & Tube Corp. Spring 1932 Catalog - The sale of radio parts was big business in the medium's early days, and many manufacturers sold both parts and "ready made" receivers, as they were called in the days of home receiver building. One such company was the Pilot Radio & Tube Corp., which had relocated from Brooklyn to Lawrence, Massachusetts. Here is the company's Spring 1932 catalog, which featured numerous parts, as well as two shortwave converters and a kit version of the Pilot "Super-Wasp" receiver (power supply extra).
  • The Pilot Radio & Tube Corp. - Shortwave was still new in 1930, and the industry, small as it was, was always looking for ways to showcase the technology, prove its indispensability, and set new records. The Pilot Radio & Tube Corp. had more to boast about than some, being the parent of one of the first line of what we would think of today as "consumer" shortwave receivers--the original Pilot "Wasp" and its "Super Wasp" progeny, all of which came to market during the years 1928-1931. To promote the wonders of the medium, the company sponsored several long-distance trips by a radio-equipped, single-engine aircraft, "The Pilot Radio." During these excursions the plane made numerous radio contacts via its transmitter, W2XBQ, while receiving signals over its Pilot A.C. "Super Wasp." The trips, first to Bermuda, and then from New York to the Caribbean and Central America, down the west coast of South America, over to Buenos Aires, and back along South America's east coast, headed to New York, were chronicled in four issues of Radio Design, the Pilot Radio house journal. Here is a file containing the four articles in the order in which they appeared. Pilot claimed numerous firsts for these flights, which eventually came to an end with the plane on its back along the beach of Great Exuma Island in the Bahamas (but with all occupants alive). With regard to the second of the four articles, about the flight to Bermuda, in 1983 Bermuda issued a postage stamp commemorating the flight. It was part of a four-stamp set about the bicentenary of the first manned flight (a 1783 balloon flight in France by the Montgolfier brothers). To learn more about the flight, Google "Pilot flight to Bermuda 1930" and you will find much information, including a nice writeup by our old friend Bob Ballantine, W8SU. If you have access to The New York Times archive you will also find many articles about the flight under dates of April 1-10, 1930. In the file of Radio Design articles (at page 10) you will find a scan of the stamp.
  • Hallicrafters and National - If you were buying a good a shortwave receiver in the 1960s, chances are you looked at radios from Hallicrafters and National, two of the best-known manufacturers of the day. Here are two items from these companies: a Hallicrafters brochure from 1964, and a booklet on National receivers (circa 1961, judging from the pictures).
  • More McMurdo Silver "Masterpiece Forum" - Here is another issue of The Masterpiece Forum, this one from June-July-August 1936.
  • More Gatti-Hallicrafters Expedition - Here is another promotional booklet about the 1947-48 Gatti-Hallicrafters Expedition, this one produced by Hallicrafters itself. The booklet was published before the expedition actually took place.
  • Gatti-Hallicrafters Expedition - The "Mountains of the Moon" would surely be a destination to get the DX juices flowing. They were the geographical target of the 1947-48 Gatti-Hallicrafters Expedition to Kenya, Tanganyika and Uganda. Said to be the first commercially-sponsored amateur DXpedition, and a big event in ham radio, the trip was the brainchild of adventurer-explorer-author-promoter Attilio Gatti, veteran of ten pre-war trips to Africa. Gatti's main partner in the adventure was the Hallicrafters Co. Here is a promotional booklet that was published by International Harvester Co., which supplied the trucks for the expedition. The booklet was published after the expedition was over. The story of the Gatti-Hallicrafters Expedition is an interesting one. To read more about it go to a site devoted to the expedition http://www.qsl.net/p/pa0abm//ghe/.
  • Radio Shack - Here is an undated Radio Shack catalog that is numbered "47," but is actually from 1941, when Radio Shack was one store in Boston. This was the company's third annual catalog, and these are the pages showing their shortwave receivers. As you can see from the "Time Payment Schedule," you could buy an SX-28 for $15.95 down and 12 monthly payments of $12.68 each. Radio Shack and Allied Radio merged in 1970. For a near-complete collection of Radio Shack catalogs and other Radio Shack memorabilia, go to http://www.radioshackcatalogs.com/ (click on "Radio Shack Catalog Archive" at the bottom of the page).
  • Eddystone - The Eddystone Company produced some of the most popular shortwave receivers used in the U.K. Here is a brochure giving a rundown of a group of Eddystone receivers, and a price list of components and accessories. The receivers are all early 1950s vintage, and the price list is dated January 1954.
  • McMurdo Silver "Masterpiece Forum" - Although E. H. Scott was surely the leader in the "hi-fi" shortwave market of the 1930s, and a world-class promoter, his main competitor, McMurdo Silver, was no slouch in the promotional department either. The McMurdo Silver "Masterpiece" series, which ranged from the Masterpiece I to the Masterpiece VI, was produced from 1932 to 1937 and was the subject of extensive company advertising. Scott had his monthly Scott News, and McMurdo Silver had The Masterpiece Forum. Here is the September 1936 issue of The Masterpiece Forum. Twenty-eight pages long, it contains letters from Masterpiece owners attesting to their reception and offering their views on various matters of DX, plus a list of shortwave broadcast stations of the world (pages 24-27).
  • "Scott Custom Built Radio--Special Deluxe Installations" - If you were a well-heeled SWL in 1940, your "shack" could have looked like one of those in this booklet. Scott receivers were not DX machines, but they had room filling audio, and these were some pretty nice rooms. Do you prefer Gene Autry's setup, or Barbara Stanwyck's? (For best viewing set Adobe Acrobat to "side-by-side with continuous scrolling.")
  • Hallicrafters 20th Anniversary Brochure - Here is a Hallicrafters brochure, issued circa 1954, containing brief writeups of receivers, transmitters, and other equipment.
  • "Official Log - National Association of Armchair Adventurers" - In the late 1950s, shortwave receivers manufactured by the National Company of Malden, Mass. were among the most popular. Here is a promotional logbook distributed by National circa 1958. Welcoming users to the "National Association of Armchair Adventurers," it contained a promotional preface about National; a 7-page introduction to shortwave listening, courtesy of Electronics Illustrated; a very nice list of mostly-SWBC stations that brings back some fond memories; a page for the user's statistics; 20 pages of log sheets (only one is included in the scan); and an inside back cover with brief writeups on the National NC-60, NC-66 and NC-188 receivers.
  • "1931-32 Short-Wave Receivers" - This is a 1931 publication of James Millen, chief engineer and general manager of the National Company. Serious shortwave receivers were just coming into use, and National was one of the first on the scene. The National "Thrill Box" came out in 1928, and by 1931 was being offered in the SW-3 and SW-5 models, both of which are described in this pamphlet. There is also a discussion of early television reception. National was one of the most famous of the early manufacturers of shortwave receivers designed for consumer use, and for decades remained a major player on the shortwave receiver scene. Although the list of stations on the inside back cover is titled "Short-Wave Broadcast Stations," the term "broadcast" is used in its widest sense. The list does include the broadcast stations of the day (W8XK, W8XAL, G5SW, I3RO, VUC, NRH, VK3ME, CT1AA, 7LO, etc.), but most of the stations shown were commercial or experimental stations.
  • National Radio Company - Here is a pamphlet from the National Radio Company containing photos and brief writeups about the receivers in the National line. Although undated, this looks like it hails from around 1960.
  • "Flight of the Skyrider, 2010" - Jerry Berg has a "new" receiver--a Hallicrafters SX-28A, vintage 1944. Here is his writeup, with photos, about his experiences in fixing up and operating this classic old receiver.
  • Atwater Kent Radio - There wasn't much going on in the shortwave world of 1926. A few American stations (KDKA, WGY) were dabbling in shortwave, as was PCJJ in Holland. But with no consumer-grade shortwave receivers, even an avid broadcast band DXer wouldn't know much about the short waves. Things were much farther along on the standard broadcast band, where, if you were looking for a high quality receiver, you might have considered an Atwater Kent. Here is an AK promotional catalog called Atwater Kent Radio. It describes the year's offerings, and discusses radio reception generally and the Atwater Kent company in particular.
  • For many years the National Radio Company of Melrose, Massachusetts was one of the leading names in shortwave receivers. Here is a booklet that was published by National in 1964 in commemoration of the company's 50th anniversary. It contains photos of much of the fondly remembered National equipment. National started business in 1914 (!) as a manufacturer of power plant specialty items. It expanded into the toy business, then aircraft parts and household items, finally getting around to radio in 1924.
  • Here is a nice Hallicrafters catalog dating from around 1948 or 1949. There are a lot of familiar communication receivers here - the SX-43, S-40A, S-53 and S-38, as well as FM, TV, and amateur equipment.
  • Electronics Illustrated-January 1962 - Here's something that will bring back memories for SWLs who were active in the late 1950s and early 1960s: a SW equipment feature from the January 1962 issue of Electronics Illustrated. The first six pages contain brief writeups on some of the most popular equipment of the day--the Knight Ocean Hopper, the Space Spanner, the Heathkit AR-3, the National NC-60, the Hallicrafters S-38, the Hammarlund HQ-145X, and others, plus accessories. Following this are three articles on "new" receiver kits of the day--the Heathkit GR-91, the Philmore CR-5AC, and the Knight-Kit R-100. "Those were the days!"
  • Disk Cutting and DXing - If you were listening during the late 1940s and the 1950s, and if you were recording your DX, you were using a reel-to-reel tape recorder. Before reel-to-reel there was wire recording, but home recording did not really catch on until tape. What was available before tape and wire for those who couldn't wait? Disk cutting, and some DXers used the technique to record their DX. Here are three articles from 1935 about disk cutting and DXing. The first, from the February issue of Short Wave Craft, deals mainly with the technology. The other two articles, from the September and December issues of Radio Index (RADEX), discuss practice. Tuning a receiver while also cutting a disk looks like no small feat--a very long way from today's digital recording.
  • "Short Wave Listening Radios" - Here is a combination catalog-primer from Hammarlund. Note the references to Popular Electronics, Gilfer, WRTH, NNRC and Radio New York Worldwide on p. 13. This was probably issued in the early 1960s.
  • 12-tube Scott Allwave Deluxe - Here is some information about the 12-tube Scott Allwave Deluxe superhet sold circa 1932: a 12-page illustrated advertising brochure, and a two-page "Technical Questionnaire." "Roll up the carpet and dance to music direct from the Hotel Mayfair in London! . . . You have a totally new experience awaiting you--when you listen to programs not only in U.S.A. but from the far distant points of the earth through the peerless SCOTT ALLWAVE DELUXE."
  • Hammarlund SP-210 - A pamphlet from Hammarlund on the company's SP-210 (with the 10" speaker--if you wanted a 12" speaker it was the SP-220). This was an 18-tube superhet with bandspread, crystal filter selectivity and coverage up to 20 mc. in five bands. It was sold during the 1940s, having first appeared around 1942. Check out those list prices on page 15.
  • World-Wide Nine Radio - A 30-page booklet about the World-Wide Nine Radio, "custom built by McMurdo-Silver," circa 1934.
  • Allied Radio 1940 - Here's a look at what Allied Radio was offering the discriminating SWL in 1940. And how about those "terms": a Hallicrafters Sky Buddy for less than $5 down and less than $5 per month.
  • "Short Wave Listeners' Guide" - Not entirely an advertisement, but a pamphlet from the National Co., "Short Wave Listeners' Guide," containing some basics about shortwave reception and a list of stations to try for. The receivers shown--NC-183D, HRO 60, NC-125 and SW-54-- suggest that this is from the early 1950s, but the station listings seem to belong to an earlier period.
  • "Your Guided Tour of the Amazing World of Short Wave Listening" - A six-page brochure from Hallicrafters presenting their 1961 line of receivers along with information about how shortwave works and what you can hear. "Those were the days."
  • Hallicrafters 1949 - Surely there is no company that produced more shortwave receivers over the years than Hallicrafters. Here is a 1949 catalog from Hallicrafters--"the radio man's radio."
  • What gear did you use when you first started listening?
  • Hallicrafters Letter Writing Contest - During late 1944 and early 1945, Hallicrafters would offer cash prizes for letters from servicemen describing their experiences with Hallicrafters equipment. Every writer received $1, and prize winners received from $10 to $200. Here are three ads for letter writing contests that appeared on the back covers of Radio News in October, November and December 1944.
  • Allied Radio Corp. - Many DXers got their start in the hobby by buying an inexpensive ready-made or kit radio from Allied Radio Corp. of Chicago. I remember paging through those big catalogs over and over. Recently I come across an Allied catalog from 1929 and was surprised to see that the company went back that far. But according to an Allied history at http://www.alliedelec.com/AlliedHistory.asp the company was founded in 1928. So this is about as early an Allied catalog as is likely to be found. I have copied some pages containing receivers that were offered at the time from Silver-Marshall, Hammarlund, Scott, National, and Pilot, plus some interesting antennas. I was also suprised to find in this 1929 catalog many items from the "Knight" line which was well-known to electronic hobbyists many years later.
  • Aero Products, Inc. - a four-page promotional pamphlet from Aero Products, Inc. of Chicago. This is a rare piece of advertising that appears to date from 1929, as it promotes "the new 1929 'Aero-Call' Converter Box." "This amazing radio instrument now makes it possible to reach 'round the world--England, Germany, Holland, France, Australia, Panama, Java and many foreign stations are some that are tuned in regulalrly on short wave." No less interesting is the collage of QSLs on page two (shortwave QSLs from the 1920s are seldom seen), and the station list on page three. Operating instructions are on page four.
  • Hammarlund - Here are some advertisements from the war years. These are from Radio News, 1943, and show the contribution that the Hammarlund Super Pro was making in the war effort.
  • Two tours of vintage shortwave radio manufacturing plants. (1) From Scott, there is a brochure called "The Story of Advanced Design and Precision Engineering in Radio," circa 1932. (2) And from the Pilot Radio & Tube Corp., an article about the "new" 1.5 million sq. foot plant in Lawrence, Massachusetts to which the company moved from its old location in Brooklyn. This is from the Fall 1930 issue of Radio Design, the company's house organ.
  • The Pilot A.C. Super-Wasp was the successor to the battery-operated set (below). "At last you can enjoy the thrills of short-wave reception with all the conveniences of full lamp-socket operation." These two articles are from the Fall 1929 and Winter 1929 issues of Radio Design. The A.C. Super-Wasp was one of the first A.C. shortwave sets.
  • Here are two articles from Radio Design, house organ of the Pilot Electric Manufacturing Co., later the Pilot Radio & Tube Corp. The company was first located in Brooklyn, New York and later moved to Lawrence, Massachusetts. The magazine was published from 1928 to 1931 and was an interesting early source of information on shortwave stations and receivers. These articles are from the Spring 1929 issue and cover one of the earliest available "consumer" shortwave receivers, the battery-operated Pilot Super-Wasp (successor to the earlier Pilot Wasp). You assembled the Super-wasp from a kit of parts obtainable from Pilot. The first article, "The Pilot Super-Wasp," describes the receiver and how to build it. Says the article: "It should not take you more than an hour and a half to assemble a Super-Wasp. Once you have mounted everything you should be able to wire the whole outfit in another hour, or even less." The second article, "How to Get the Most Out of A Short-Wave Receiver," explains how to use the set.
  • E.H. Scott "Proof of Consistent Foreign Reception" - In additon to high end receivers, E. H. Scott produced some wonderful literature about their sets. Here is a 20-page sepia-toned brochure from 1932 entitled "Proof of Consistent Foreign Reception." These were the early days of shortwave broadcasting. In the upscale format typical of Scott, he explains in detail the prowess of his Scott Allwave receiver and the longterm monitoring and audio recording that permitted him to prove it. Also in this publication are some nice lists of stations of the day.
  • "Methods for Improving Short Wave Reception," a pamphlet from Postal Radio explaining why the Postal Two Stage Tuned R.F. Pre-Selector and Booster is just what the doctor ordered. There is no date on this, but the NRA symbol places it in the period 1933-35.
  • Gilfer Associates - Here are some memories of Gilfer Associates, Inc., a favorite shortwave mail order house in the 1960s, 1970s and after. Oliver P. (Perry) Ferrell and XYL Jeanne began the business circa 1952 and were well-known in the DX community. Perry died in an automobile accident in 1984 and Jeanne carried on the business until she sold it in 1994. Gilfer closed in 1997. Here are some Gilfer catalogs from 1970 and 1974. R.I.P., Gilfer and Perry Ferrell.
  • Silver-Marshall - Silver-Marshall was one of the great names in early radio manufacturing. Here are the pages from their December 1, 1928 catalog covering receivers. Note the "730 Round the World Four" shortwave receiver on page 10. Omitted are catalog pages covering parts and amplifiers.

LITERATURE & HUMOR

  • "A Short-Wave Journey of Discovery" - Born in Holland but educated mainly in the United States, Hendrik van Loon was a man of many arts--author, journalist, lecturer, raconteur and, as The New York Times put it, "indefatigable interpreter of human accomplishments." The title of his 1921 best seller, "The Story of Mankind" (1921), exemplified his larger-than-life personal and professional persona. As one reviewer observed, in van Loon's writings on history you were certain of getting "plenty of history and plenty of van Loon." He had sold some 6 million copies of his many books by the time he died in 1944, at which time he was at work on his autobiography, which he titled "A Report to St. Peter." Van Loon knew something about shortwave. He organized the "Uncle Hank" wartime broadcasts to occupied Holland over WRUL Before that, he was the author of an article, "A Short-Wave Journey of Discovery," published by RCA in 1937 in a promotional booklet of the same name which we have posted here. In it van Loon opines on his discoveries and experiences with regard to the inventions of modern communication (he was born in 1882), including broadcasting, and on the role shortwave would likely play in the future. Also contributing to the publication was Laurence M. Cockaday, a prolific radio author of the 1920s and 30s, whose entries are much more oriented toward DX ("A Guide to Short-Wave Listening" and "How to Tune In Foreign Stations"). This booklet is one of the nicest pieces of "company" shortwave literature I have seen.
  • And More Humorous Postcards - Here is another group of humorous radio-related postcards from radio's early days.
  • More Humorous Postcards - Radio and humor were a frequent combination in radio's early days. Here is a file of humorous radio-related postcards. The first three were used by radio repairmen, presumably to inform customers of their services, and were printed by National Union Radio Tubes.
  • "Your First Wireless Set" - From Britain's Punch magazine circa 1940.
  • Charlie Loudenboomer - Some of today's DXers may have heard of Charlie Loudenboomer, whose attempts at hobby humor appeared in the NASWA bulletin, "FRENDX," from January 1966 to January 1977. But how many have actually read them? Here are some early examples taken from "The Best of Loudenboomer, the Collected Works of Charlie Loudenboomer, Vol. 1," published circa 1973.
  • "The DX Editors' Lexicon" - Two pages of tounge-in-cheek DX definitions taken from Bandspread, the publication of the British Association of DXers. Bandspread was published from 1970 to 1974 by Alan Thompson, an early leader of the World DX Club and former Secretary General of the European DX Council. Thompson's intensity for the hobby and his wry sense of humor show through in these definitions.
  • Humorous Postcards - Radio often tickled the funny bone in its early days. Here are some postcards that make the point.
  • Here are two articles from the early days of broadcast band listening: "A First Night With a First Set," a December 1924 story from Radio News about a set constructor's experiences (with a surprise ending); and a March 1928 Radio News article, "Wisdom for Radio Widows," "A straight-from-the-shoulder talk to the woman whose husband belongs to the Order of the Sleepless Knights of DX."
  • La Rayotelefonia - A poem in Spanish that appeared in the 1922 radio publication "Radio Revista" - from Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, and translated into English by Horacio Nigro and Don Moore, Iowa.

PEOPLE

  • "Remembering Bob Hill" - The DX world has lost one of its most able sons, Bob Hill, who passed away on February 27, 2017. "Remembering Bob Hill" is a review of Bob's DX career with messages from many of his friends. (Readers should feel free to repost this remembrance on their own sites if they wish.) R.I.P., Bobbus.
  • George Cox - If you were DXing in the 1950s and 1960s, you probably remember the name of well-respected Wilmington, Delaware DXer George R. Cox. Here are two items from Popular Electronics of that era: an article about George, and an article by George about tropical band DXing.
  • National Radio Club "Reminiscences" - The National Radio Club is the oldest and largest medium wave DX club, founded in 1933 (and still operating today). In the Jan. 4, 1941 NRC "DX News," publisher Ray Edge asked the veteran members to relive some of their past listening experiences for a special series of articles. Here is a file with reminiscing from Al Bartholomew, Bob Botzum, Joe Becker, Joe Brauner, Leo Herz, and Pat Reilley. These  reminiscences appeared only in the January-June 1941 NRC bulletins.
  • Tom Williamson - While looking through copies of Short Wave News we found a very nice writeup about an old friend, the late Tom Williamson of Canada. It was published in February 1950. You can find Tom's DX biography, "Across Time--and Space," and his ODXA "Looking Back" columns, under "Specialized Resources."
  • "The World At A Twirl" - Ken Boord was the best-known American DX editor during the years 1944-1955 when he wrote the "International Short-Wave" column for Radio News (and briefly for Popular Electronics). He reappeared in 1960 as shortwave editor for the new DXing Horizons magazine. Between those two jobs Ken published a valuable primer on shortwave broadcast listening. It was called The World At A Twirl, a phrase that identified the Boord "brand" in those days (and was commonly abbreviated WT). WT was 126 pages long and labeled "First Edition, Summer 1956," although no subsequent editions are known to have been published. It was a compendium of all sorts of valuable information. Part I featured station profiles, photos of stations, DXers, QSLs and SWL cards, information on DXing techniques, clubs, and radio personalities, and reports on Boord visits to other DXers. Part II consisted of extensive lists of shortwave stations big and small. In Part III were more photos, plus "Press-Time Flashes." The book is a very thorough presentation of the SWLing of the day as seen through the eyes of one of its greatest promoters.
  • Earl R. Roberts - Thanks to Bob Ballantine, W8SU, who has sent us this interesting bio of Earl R. Roberts, a well-known BCB DXer of the 1930s who moved on to shortwave, serving as NNRC shortwave editor from 1935 to 1942, and amateur section editor from 1946 to 1950.
  • LeRoy Waite - If you were DXing in the 1950s-60s, you were probably a member of the Newark News Radio Club, and you will probably recall the name of LeRoy Waite of Ballston Spa, New York. Roy was the amateur section editor from 1952 to 1969, although he did some SWBC DXing as well. Here is a small tribute to Roy.
  • More DXing Horizons "Shortwave Profiles" - Here is another group of "Shortwave Profiles" from "DXing Horizons." This group includes John and Marjorie Gibson, Al Niblack, Sidney Pearce, Sam Rowell, Ab Saylor, and Paul Silver.
  • DXing Horizons "Shortwave Profiles" - "DXing Horizons" was a short-lived but very nice DX magazine that was published from January 1960 to April 1961. Nearly half the magazine was devoted to shortwave, with other forms of DX taking up the rest. The shortwave editor was Ken Boord, probably the best known DX editor of the time. This was Ken's final appearance as a DX editor. Among the "DXH" features was the "Shortwave Profile" where Ken highlighted particular DXers. John Herkimer has gone through DXH and extracted these profiles, and we have posted the first group. Included this time are profiles of August Balbi, Anson Boice, Floyd Backus, George Cox, Arthur Cushen, and Jerry Berg.
  • Hank Bennett's First NNRC Column - All American SWBC DXers who entered the hobby in the 1950s and 1960s know the name Hank Bennett. Hank was shortwave editor for the Newark News Radio Club for decades, right up until the club closed in 1982. He became interested in shortwave listening in 1938, and obtained his ham license eight years later. His name started appearing as a bulletin contributor in 1945, at which time he was in the Seventh Army's Signal Corps in Europe. Here is Hank's first column for the NNRC Bulletin. It appeared in the December 1949 issue, when he took over from Jimmy Hart, who had edited the column since 1943. Bennett also served as Popular Electronics shortwave editor from 1955 to 1970. In 1970-71 he edited a SWBC column for the short-lived Radio Today magazine, and he wrote a column in Monitoring Times from 1983 to 1986.
  • "The Way We Were in NASWA" - Before March 1972, when Dan Ferguson took the club to offset booklet-style printing, the North American Shortwave Assn. (NASWA) bulletin was mimeographed. For a couple of years starting in 1970, "FRENDX" would sometimes contain picture pages featuring photos of members. Here are some of the picture pages from 1970-71, including the brief writeups which accompanied the photos. Here are some of the picture pages from 1971-72. And more of "The Boys of NASWA," these picture pages are from 1972. And, finally, these picture pages are from 1973.
  • Cesar Objio - Here is a photo of the well-known DXer from the Dominican Republic who passed away on September 3, 2004 at the age of 76. Cesar was well-known and highly regarded by DXers the world over. Thanks to his daughter, Ana Objio, for sending this picture.
  • August Balbi's Logbook - Here is legendary California DXer August Balbi's logbook for 1936. He kept his records in this book marked on the front, "World Short Wave Radio." The inside front and back covers are decorated with various cutouts, including two from the covers of Short Wave Craft magazine of the day. The pages reveal August to have been a meticulous record keeper. His daily log shows the stations that he heard, and that he returned to often to make notes of reception quality which could then be compared over time. He also kept a list of new stations heard. As August's penmanship suggests, computers were not even a twinkle in this DXer's eye.
  • Newark News Radio Club - In 1937, the NNRC published a series of 3" x 5" photo cards containing a photo of the member on the front, and something about the member and his or her hobby interests on the back. Jerry Berg has almost 50 of these cards and they are posted here.
  • "Where Are They Now"? Harold Sellers of Ontario, Canada, sends along photos of some Canadian DXers taken from the January 1965 issue of "electron" magazine.
  • Bob Hill Log Reports - Here are some of the log reports of Littleton, Mass. DXer Bob Hill that date from 1965-66. This was the period when Bob was listening first from Boston, then from Washington, D.C. Thanks to Bob for permission to post these.

PHILATELY

  • More Poster Stamps - Here are two more files of "poster stamps" for radio shows, which were, in the 1920s (some later), a popular way for companies to promote their radio equipment. One file is for domestic shows, the other is for shows in other countries.
  • Gabon - Here is a file with several first day covers from Gabon. The first cover, from 1984, commemorates the third anniversary of the start of regular transmissions from Africa No. One (which had begun testing in 1979). Below the cover is a link to an excellent history on the Moyabi station, written and recently updated by Tony Rogers for the British DX Club. Also in the file are three other radio-related first day covers issued from Gabon in 1964, 1971 and 1973.
  • More Vatican First Day Covers - The number of Vatican first day covers seems endless. We have posted several groups of these in the past, (below) and we now post what is probably the last group, at least for a while.
  • Toblerone Cinderella Stamps - The Swiss chocolatier Toblerone began selling high quality chocolates in 1908. During the early decades of the 1900s, "Tobler" issued a multitude of cinderella stamps in connection with their products (a "cinderella" is a stamp intended for non-postage purposes, usually advertising). Tobler stamps covered many different topics, radio being one. (There were even some in "Ido," a relative of the Esperanto "language.") Here are the 12 Tobler stamps in the "Radio and Its Application" series. They depict a variety of scenes from radio's early days--stations, receiving equipment, studios, radio-equipped ships, "listening" scenes, etc. Zoom in for the detail.
  • BBC Atlantic Relay Station on Ascension Island - The BBC Atlantic Relay Station on Ascension Island went into service in 1966 and is still in operation. It has been the subject of a number of special postal issues. We have already posted several, specifically 1966 (opening of the station), and 1991, 1996 and 1982 (1991, 25th anniversary of the station; 1996, 30th anniversary; 1982, 50th anniversary of BBC external broadcasting). Now there is a new set of six Ascension relay station stamps, issued on July 3, 2016, the station's 50th anniversary. Here is a PDF containing the new stamps, the official first-day cover, a brochure accompanying the cover, describing the scenes on the stamps and providing some interesting history, and the mailing envelope for the package, which is a nice postal item in itself. The stamps and cover can be ordered online from the Ascension Island post office.
  • More Vatican First Day Covers - Is there any jurisdiction for which there are more radio-related covers and other postal items than the Vatican? We have already posted several groups, and now here is another one.
  • More Africa - Here is another group of radio-related philatelic items from Africa. Included are: (1) a 2012 cover from Algeria recognizing 50 years of an independent RTA (Radio-TV Algerienne); (2) a 1964 cover about microwave transmissions in Annaba, Algeria; (3) two covers from an old Angolan SWer, R. Clube do Humabo, promoting a philatelic show in Nova Lisboa in 1974; (4) a 1968 cover from the Ivory Coast recognizing a station in Tabou; (5) a 1960 Libyan cover issued on the occasion of the Third Pan Arab Congress on Radio & TV; (6) a 1963 Madagascar cover about microwave transmissions between Tananarive and Fianarantsoa; (7) a 1963 cover from Niger recognizing the second anniversary of the African and Malgache Post & Telecommunications Union; (8) a 1977 cover and data sheet about 21 years of SABC broadcasting in Southwest Africa (now Namibia); and (9) several postal items celebrating the first anniversary of Radio Transkei (one of the short-lived South African "homelands").
  • Africa - Here is a file containing a number of philatelic items from Africa, specifically: (1) a stamp and postcard with a view of announcers at Radio Congo Belge, Belgian Congo, issued in Brussels on Congo independence day, June 30, 1960 (after which it was known as the Republic of the Congo); (2) a cover containing the first stamps issued by the Republic of Biafra, not radio-related but a nice reminder of the "original" Radio Biafra (Biafra was declared "independent" on May 30, 1967); (3) a set of four "communication" stamps issued on the tenth anniversary of the nominal "independence" of Bophuthatswama; the stamps are on postcard views of "Radio BOP"; (4) a 1996 first day cover issued on behalf of Radio Botswana and containing four radio-related stamps; (5) a 1959 cover with stamps issued by Egypt on behalf of the Arab Union of Telecommunications (Egypt was part of the United Arab Republic [Egypt and Syria] at the time); and (6) a cover with a stamp issued by Rwanda in 1974 on the centennial anniversary of the birth of Guglielmo Marconi (countless "Marconi" stamps have been issued by countries around the world).
  • More Covers - Here are five radio-related items: (1) from Austria, a 40th anniversary cover and three 50th anniversary covers for Radio Austria-Oesterreichischer Rundfunk; (2) from Belgium, four items commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Belgian radio networks; (3) from Norway, two 50th anniversary covers, and a 1965 cover for the coastal station Isfjord Radio; (4) a 1992 cover from St. Helena commemorating four island anniversaries, including Radio St. Helena's 25th; and (5) from the former Yugoslavia, a 30th and a 40th anniversary cover for Radio Koper Capodistria, and two 2006 Serbian cards recognizing Nikola Tesla.
  • More Vatican First Day Covers - Here is another group of first day covers from the Vatican.
  • More Covers - Here is a file containing various postage covers from south of the border (some very far south), specifically: (1) Mexican radio stars (1995); (2) 50th anniversary of radiotelephone transmissions in Argentina (1970); (3) the Third South American Radio Communications Conference , Rio de Janeiro (1945); (4) 50th anniversary of the Federal Broadcasting System of Brazil (1986, two images); (5) 50th anniversary of an ex-Colombian AM-FMer, HJCK (2000); (6) 50th anniversary of Radio Nacional de Colombia (1990); (7) dual 10th/60th anniversaries of utility communications in the Falkland Islands (1977); (8) communications in South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands (2006); and (9) a postal cachet of Armed Forces Radio-McMurdo, 6012 kHz. (1983).
  • DZRH Philippines - Here is a recent Philippine first-day cover commemorating 75 years of DZRH news.
  • Radio Oranje - The governments in exile of a number of European countries were headquartered in London, and were allotted time on the BBC to address their peoples in their own languages. Six weeks after the de Gaulle broadcast, the Dutch created "Radio Oranje," a daily 20-minute BBC program which became an important point of contact with the people of occupied Holland. In 1993 the Netherlands issued two postage stamps commemorating Radio Oranje. Here is a file containing a number of covers and cards bearing these Radio Oranje stamps. The first two items in the file we had posted earlier by themselves. The first is a letter issued by Radio Netherlands at the time the stamps were issued. The letter, which is on a reprint of the original Radio Oranje letterhead, contains more information about the station. The second item in the file is a first day cover which bears the Radio Oranje stamps and also a "Radio-Oranje" stamping that was made with a rubber stamp that was used by the station when it operated from London.
  • Charles de Gaulle - France capitulated to the Nazis on June 17, 1940, and the next day, on the BBC, a little-known General Charles de Gaulle, who had fled to England a few days earlier, made his famous appeal to his countrymen to fight on. France has issued many stamps honoring General de Gaulle, and a variety of covers and cards have recognized the June 18 broadcast. Here is a file containing some of these.
  • Comoros - The opening of the station in Dzaoudzi in 1960 was commemorated by the issuance of two good-looking postage stamps. We have posted these stamps, together with two first-day covers celebrating the event. As you can see, one of the stamps shows the station's shortwave frequencies. Also in this file is another cover, from 1972, celebrating the establishment of radiotelegraph service between Moroni and Paris.
  • U.N. Radio - It has been a long time since United Nations Radio has had a regular presence on shortwave. However, it still produces programs, which it posts on line and which are rebroadcast by various stations around the world. On World Radio Day, February 13, 2013, the U.N. issued a series of six postage stamps commemorating U.N. Radio. Here is a file showing the first day covers, together with information about the stamps from the U.N. philatelic bulletin. U.N. stamps denominated in U.S., Swiss and Euro funds are valid postage for mailings from the U.N. facilities in New York, Geneva and Vienna respectively.
  • Montserrat and Uruguay First Day Covers - Here is a first day cover from Montserrat with four stamps showing radio stations on the island--Radio Montserrat, Radio Gem FM, Radio Antilles, and Cable & Wireless. (Mediumwave Radio Antilles and the BBC-DW Relay Station were both part of the Antilles Radio Corp. Ltd.). And we have posted a file containing five postal items from Uruguay: (1) a cover and (2) a postcard bearing the 1974 "50 Aniversario Radiodiusora Nacional" stamp; (3) a 1998 cover with the "70 Aniversario de Radio--Carve" stamp; and (4) and (5), two covers, each with a different four-stamp block of "SODRE" stamps issued on the occasion of SODRE's 70th anniversary in 1999.
  • More First Day Covers - Here is another group of first-day covers from stations and radio-related organizations: (1) a first-day cover from 2002 recognizing All India Radio and 75 Years of Indian Broadcasting; (2) a 2011 stamp and a good-looking cover recognizing 100 years of the Indian Corps of Signals; (3) from 2011, a stamp and first-day cover for the Frequency Allocation Board of Pakistan; (4) a 2011 stamp and cover on behalf of HJCK, "El Mundo en Bogota," formerly a Colombian FM and AM station, now internet only; (5) a 1992 stamp and cover for the 70th Anniversary of Chilean radio; (6) a stamp and cover issued in 1969 on the occasion of the inauguration of the Radio Nederland Bonaire relay station; and (7) a series of six stamps and a 2006 first-day cover celebrating the 70th Anniversary of ZNS, Bahamas (which used to broadcast on shortwave).
  • Australia First Day Covers - Here are some first day covers from Australia. These are: (1) a cover celebrating the 50th anniversary of regular radio broadcasting, 1923-1973; (2) a FDC recognizing the 50th anniversary of the Australian Broadcasting Commission, 1932-1982, and also containing a stamp and cancellation for the 50th anniversary of Radio Australia, 1939-1989; (3), (4), (5) and (6) two maxi-cards, front and back, again for the 50th anniversary of the ABC; and (7) a FDC honoring the 50th anniversary of Radio Australia.
  • Danish Radio History - This file contains several items relating to Danish radio history: four first day covers displaying a stamp commemorating the 25th anniversary of Danish state radio, April 1, 1950; the same stamp on a postcard view of the Kalundborg Radio towers, postmarked 1951; and a 1975 first day cover displaying a stamp commemorating the 50th anniversary of Danmarks Radio (Danish state radio).
  • Radio Japan 25th Anniversary First Day Covers - We have previously posted some first day covers honoring Radio Japan. Here are seven more commemorating the station's 25th Anniversary. The stamp was issued on June 1, 1960.
  • More Cuban First Day Covers - We have posted some Cuban first day covers before. Here is another group: two covers commemorating Servicio de Radiodifusion Internacional (1962, the year following the inauguration of Cuba's 100 kw. shortwave transmitting plant); one recognizing Radio Habana Cuba's 40th Anniversary (2001); and three covers acknowledging the 40th (1998), 45th (2003) and 50th (2008) anniversaries of Radio Rebelde.
  • Voice of America - On August 1, 1967, the U.S. Post Office issued a five-cent Voice of America stamp, and here are some of the covers that were available at the time.
  • Radio Club Seals/Stickers - Many radio clubs have issued seals or stickers from time to time for use on reception reports or members' correspondence. Here is a new file which includes seals or stickers from: (1) Canadian DX Relay, an early Canadian broadcast band club; (2) the International Short Wave Club; (3) an early sticker from the Newark News Radio Club which displays an inset for the "Newark News DX Club," the club's original name; (4) the traditional NNRC seal (in both red-black-gold and green-black-gold); (5) the National Radio Club; (6) the Radio League of America, a Gernsback-sponsored amateur radio organization formed in 1915; (7) the otherwise-unknown Round the World DX Club; and (8) the Radio Signal Survey League (RSSL), a group formed in 1937 by All-Wave Radio magazine.
  • More Poster Stamps - Here are more radio-related poster stamps. These are from Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston, Cleveland, New York, Rochester, St. Louis, and Detroit.
  • Poster Stamps - A "cinderella" is any stamp that is not useable for postage. "Poster stamps" are a subcategory of cinderellas, usually used for advertising or promotional purposes. Poster stamps were a popular collectible in the 1920s and 1930s. Here is a file containing examples of a number of radio-related poster stamps, mostly for radio shows where manufacturers displayed their latest wares. The stamps are from New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, St. Louis, and Detroit. The "Radio Exhibition Olympia" stamp is probably from the U.K.
  • More First Day Covers - Here are seven radio-related first day covers: Radio Romania, 80 Years, 2008; Radio Gambia, 10 Years, 1972; Radio Andorra, 2010; Radio Vaticana, 1959; Radio Kuwait, 50 years, 2001; Prasar Bharati (Broadcasting Corp. of India), 50 Years, 1998; and Radio Luxembourg, 50 Years, 1979.
  • Canadian Covers - Here are eight radio-related postal covers from Canada. The first five were issued in connection with the 1971 "RCI Speaking to the World" stamp commemorating RCI's installation of new high power transmitters in Sackville, New Brunswick (the fourth cover has an explanatory insert). The sixth cover features the CBC "exploding pizza" stamp issued in 1986 (the reverse of the cover explains this well-known CBC symbol). The seventh cover is also from 1986, and features an overprint memorializing the 1986 ANARC Convention in Montreal. The final cover memorializes the first Seventh Day Adventist Church World Session held in Canada (2000), and includes an Adventist World Radio-Toronto imprint on the front. Two other Canadian covers were posted in this "Philately" section in the past, one from 1971, the other from 1986.
  • Here are some new philately items: (1) an envelope from HCJB showing the various mediumwave and shortwave frequencies that the station was using at the time (1948, if I read the postmark correctly); (2) a 1979 stamp from Radio Nacional de Bolivia commemorating the station's 50th anniversary; (3) a stamp from Peru depicting the Radio Nacional del Peru antennas and giving the call letters and frequencies of familiar R. Nacional shortwave channels 9562 and 6082 kHz.; (4) a first day cover issued in 1970 to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Trans World Radio transmissions from Bonaire; (5) a first day cover issued in 2008 in recognition of Radio El Salvador; and (6) a great looking 12-stamp sheet issued by Galei Zahal, the Israeli armed forces station, in 2008.
  • More First Day Covers - (1) 50th Anniversary of Swiss Radio International, 1985; (2) 50th Anniversary of Norsk Rikskringkasting, Norway, 1975; (3) the inauguration of new Radio Canada International transmitters in Sackville, 1971; (4) 50th Anniversary of broadcasting in Japan (NHK), 1975; 50th Anniversary of Radio Nepal, 2000; and (6) a 25th Anniversary commemorative sheet from Radio Nacional de Angola.
  • More First Day Covers - (1) the new HCJB first day cover commemorating the station's 75th anniversary; and (2) a file containg a variety of FDCs for Vatican stamps issued to commemorate Vatican Radio--a 1981 series for the station's 50th anniversary, and some 1959 stamps for the inauguration of the Santa Maria di Galeria transmitter site.
  • All India Radio - Here are some items from All India Radio, which began broadcasting in 1936: a first day cover issued on June 8, 1961 in commemoration of AIR's 25th anniversary, an informative pamphlet issued by AIR in connection with the event, and a postcard of the AIR building constructed in New Delhi in 1940. The postcard was sent from Colombo, Ceylon to New York in 1954.
  • More First Day Covers- More stamps, these from 1991, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Radio Quito, a longtime presence on 4919 kHz. Also, a first day cover with the same stamps, along with an explanatory folder; plus a first day cover and explanatory card for three stamps issued in 1980 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of HCJB.
  • More First Day Covers - Two first day covers celebrating Radio Japan's 25th anniversary, June 1, 1960, together with an English-Japanese explanatory card; two additional first-day covers from the BBC Ascension Island relay station, one commemorating the station's 25th anniversary (1991) and the other celebrating its 30th anniversary (1996); a FDC from Radio Maryja, Poland, celebrating its 10th anniversary (2001); and a 2005 FDC celebrating the 100th birthday of Lahti, Finland. One of the two stamps on the Lahti cover depicts the Lahti transmitter towers from which Radio Finland broadcast on shortwave for many years, and on the back is an aerial view of the transmitter site. Finally, there is a brief article about radio stamp collecting from the July 1956 issue of Popular Electronics.
  • More First Day Covers- Taiwan, 30th Anniversary of Broadcasting, 1927-1957; Austria, 50 Years of Radio Austria (1974); CBC-Radio Canada (1986); and Fiji, Birth of Radio Communications, 1996 (ZJV was the Fiji Broadcasting Corp., Ltd.).
  • 50 Years of Mexican Broadcasting - DXer Tetsuya Hirahara of Japan has sent along two first day covers, a postal card, and an explanation (in Spanish) from 1971 when Mexico commemorated 50 years of broadcasting.
  • "Golden Days of Radio" - four Australian stamps issued on June 13, 1991.
  • Radio Monte Carlo - A 1951 first day cover recognizing Radio Monte Carlo, Monaco.
  • BBC Ascension/Radio Netherlands Bonaire - Two first day covers commemorating the opening of shortwave relay stations--the BBC on Ascension (1966), and the Radio Netherlands relay on Bonaire (1969).
  • Marconi & Fleming First Day Covers - Here are two recently released covers from Canada.
  • Cuban Radio Covers - Here are some interesting first day covers memorializing various aspects of Cuban radio.
  • Here is a first day cover from the International Telecommunications Conference of 1938 held in Cairo, Egypt.
  • Edward S. ("Ted") Rogers, Canadian 3BP, the inventor of the first American tube with an AC-operated filament that produced an acceptable low level of hum (1924-25) was recently honored on a stamp issued by the Canadian post office.

POW MONITORING

  • "Unbroken and the POW Messages of Louie Zamperini" - Unbroken is the title of the 2010 book by Laura Hillenbrand and the movie of the same name that was released four years later. It was a surprise to learn that California's 1936 hometown hero, Olympic runner Louie Zamperini, who spent a month and a half on a raft and two years getting rough treatment in Japanese prisoner camps, had himself voiced a POW message over Radio Tokyo. This paper, by Jerry Berg, presents the story.
  • "Short Waves of Hope" - Previously we posted a POW message recorded by listener B. O. South of San Francisco, California. Another message recorded by B. O. South, in April 1945, is on file at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, and can be heard by going to www.awm.gov.au/collection/S05891/ and clicking one of the numbered sound files ("Sound 1," "Sound 2," etc.; they are all the same recording). The message also features in a short article, "Short Waves of Hope," written by AWM Asst. Sound Curator Gabrielle Considine for AWM's "Wartime" magazine for October 2014. We have posted the article, and if you zoom in on it you can read the details on the record label and the cardboard mailer. The text of the message is in the article.
  • "POW Monitoring in the NNRC" - Here is another article by Jerry Berg with some pages from the wartime NNRC bulletin where the POW monitoring activities of several club members are discussed.
  • "POW Monitoring and the Messages of Alfred R. Young" - We have posted some of the thank you letters received by August Balbi for POW messages that he heard on shortwave and forwarded to POW families during World War II. The other half of the communications link is, of course, the original card or letter sent by the listener to the family. A large collection of such cards and letters, received by the parents of Alfred R. Young, who was a POW in Japan during the war, have been posted by Young's son at http://www.alyoung.com/My_Fathers_Captivity/Documents/ In this article, Jerry Berg takes a detailed look at these cards and letters to see what they tell us about POW message monitoring during Word War II. The article is best read in connection with a visit to http://www.alyoung.com/My_Fathers_Captivity/Documents/ because many of the cards and letters posted there are referred to in the article.
  • August Balbi's POW Monitoring, Part V - Here is another group of thank you's sent to August Balbi by families to whom he relayed POW messages during World War II.
  • August Balbi's POW Monitoring, Part IV - Here is another group of thank you cards and letters received by DXer August Balbi from the families to whom he sent word of POW messages heard from Far Eastern Axis stations during World War II.
  • August Balbi's POW Monitoring, Part III - After sending a postcard to the POW's family, POW monitors were often rewarded with a card or letter of thanks.
  • August Balbi's POW Monitoring, Part II - In Part I we showed typed lists of some of the POW messages that August Balbi heard over Radio Tokyo, MTCY-Manchuria, and Berlin. This time we have scanned some of August's notes that contain details of the messages themselves.
  • August Balbi's POW Monitoring, Part I - Among the August Balbi DX materials that were turned over to CPRV in 1988 are some fascinating items pertaining to World War II POW monitoring, i.e. the practice of transcribing POW messages broadcast over the shortwave station where the prisoner was interned and forwarding the message on to family members. Here in Part I are lists of some of the POW messages that August Balbi heard over Radio Tokyo, MTCY-Manchuria, and Berlin.
  • Amazing War Effort By A Small Group - Here is an article received from the New Zealand Radio DX League authored by long time Kiwi DXer Jack Fox, detailing the history of the POW message monitoring effort in New Zealand during World War II.
  • World War II Radio Heroes: Letters of Compassion - A review of a new book by Lisa L. Spahr which focuses on two elements of the POW monitoring story: the Short-Wave Amateur Monitors Club, which was formed to organize POW monitors, and the American government's reaction to POW monitoring.
  • Radio Tokyo POW Message - Here is an actual POW message read over what was then known as Radio Tokyo. It was recorded on January 5, 1945 by one B. O. South of San Francisco, California, who must have made POW recordings regularly, as the envelope in which the recording was mailed contains the machine-printed message, "Postmaster: Contents--Recorded Voice from Prisoner of War in Japan. Please HAND CANCEL." As shown on the envelope, the home made, cardboard-style record apparently traveled from Wilmington, North Carolina (home of the family of the POW, Milton G. White), to Fort Bliss, Texas, to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. The back of the envelope also contains a Columbus, Ohio postmark. The POW message was read by a studio announcer, which was the standard practice back then. A transcription of the POW message, the record, and mailing envelope can be seen here.
  • "A Passion With A Purpose--The Prisoner of War Message Service, 1951-1952," by Dr. Frank Glen of New Zealand. The POW message services of World War II are now fairly well known. This article, which appears in the September 2003 edition of the New Zealand Radio DX League's New Zealand DX Times, chronicles a similar but little known effort during the Korean war wherein SWLs monitored POW broadcasts over Radio Peking and passed their contents along to loved ones and the government. Thanks to Frank Glen and the NZRDXL for permission to reproduce this excellent article.
  • POW Monitoring in World War II - by Morton Bardfield, W1UQ.
  • Short-Wave Radio Monitors Let Families Know of Their Capture by Thom Wilson.

GENERAL RADIO HISTORY

  • More NBC Monitoring - Returning to the subject of NBC shortwave monitoring during the war, here is an oversize (11 x 17") information piece issued by NBC in 1941 describing it's then-new monitoring post in Bellmore, Long Island. It outlines the NBC international news gathering system and dramatizes listening post activities. It also contains many interesting photos.
  • NBC Monitoring Post - By the time Europe was engaged in war, shortwave had become a reliable means of long distance communication, and many countries were engaged in shortwave broadcasting. In order to provide up-to-the-minute news, some American media organizations set up their own monitoring posts. NBC's was located first at Rockefeller Center in New York City, then at Bellmore, Long Island. Here is an article from the July 1941 issue of RCA Review describing the NBC monitoring setup.
  • 1XAL - In 1924, Irving Vermilya of Mattapoisett, Massachusetts operated his broadcast band station, WBBG, on 1250 kc., 240 meters. In those days people often held multiple licenses in different categories, and that was the case with Irving. His call letters as a "special land station"--reserved for experimental operations--were 1XAL (no relation to the later Boston SWBC station W1XAL), and he was authorized to operate on 200 meters and 1277-1304 meters (1500 kc. and 230-235 kc.). Irving used 1XAL to conduct long distance tests, and he made a series of broadcasts in which he hoped to reach Manchester, England. Whether he accomplished this is unknown, but he definitely was heard closer to home. Here is a group of 13 postcard reports that Irving received for a 1XAL test on Saturday night-Sunday morning, May 10-11, 1924. Most were from nearby places--Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Maine--but a few were from farther afield: Norwich, New York and New York City, Philadelphia and Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, and distant Valparaiso, Indiana. Judging from these cards it looks like Irving used broadcast programming for these tests. Most of the cards are in the nature of applause cards rather than classic reception reports; in only two did the writer request a confirmation.
  • "FBIS in Retrospect" - In 1971, the Foreign Broadcast Information Service published "FBIS in Retrospect," a 56-page report highlighting various historic broadcasts that the agency had monitored over its then-30 year life, Among them: the attempted assassination of Hitler; Japan's surrender; the death of Stalin; the Soviet move into Hungary; the Soviet missile pullout from Cuba; Khrushchev's retirement; the start of the Six-Day War in the Middle East; etc.
  • "The Future of International Short-Wave Reception" - As more and more stations reduce or cancel their shortwave activity in favor of other media platforms, it is worth remembering how much hope shortwave engendered in its early days. During the months of April through July, 1935, Charles A. Morrison, President of the International DXers Alliance, an international DX club, wrote a four-part series in Radio News called "The Future of International Short-Wave Reception." Morrison felt the world was on the verge of a "new international unity," thanks largely to shortwave. In addition to his prognostications about the future of shortwave, he gave a nice review of the DX scene--stations and equipment--of the day. Here are the the four Morrison articles in one file.
  • "Rip Discovers Radio" - This is a pamphlet from RCA called "Rip Discovers Radio" in which an RCA information girl explains to an awakening Rip Van Winkle all about the wonders of 1939 RCA.
  • Soviet Jamming - Here is a potted history of Soviet jamming, issued by the USIA in May 1987.
  • Wireless Telegraphy - An article from the November 1899 (!) issue of Machinery magazine, reminding us of what high-tech was back then.
  • "Ultra-High" Broadcasting - During the 1930s and 1940s, many U.S. stations conducted experimental broadcasting in the 25-27 and 42-50 MHz. bands. One of those who followed these developments closely was Perry Ferrell, who decades later would be the co-founder of Gilfer Shortwave and a good friend to DXers (including many ontheshortwaves followers). Here is an article by Perry from the January 1940 issue of Radio & Television (originally Short Wave Craft). A few years earlier Perry wrote a regular column on "ultra-high" stations for another magazine, All-Wave Radio. On the last two pages of this file, check out the Pacific shortwave news and "Let's Listen In With Joe Miller," with items from Italian East Africa, Manchukuo, and Indo-China. It was indeed another era.
  • War Across the Airwaves by Lesley Chamberlain - an interesting piece about the early days of the BBC Monitoring Service, pointed out by Mike Barraclough of the World DX Club.
  • Early Amateur Radio History by Bill Smith.
  • Reginald Aubrey Fessenden by Brian Smith.
  • Long time DXer Jim Cumbie of Dallas, Texas has sent along some interesting magazine articles about early radio.